Hybrid tomato variety H1651

Information

  • Patent Grant
  • 10314260
  • Patent Number
    10,314,260
  • Date Filed
    Thursday, December 28, 2017
    a year ago
  • Date Issued
    Tuesday, June 11, 2019
    5 days ago
Abstract
Hybrid tomato variety ‘H1651’ is described. The tomato variety is a ground-culture hybrid tomato variety suitable for machine harvest, and is adaptable to the climactic conditions of regions such as California (USA), Ontario (Canada), Australia, Portugal, Spain, and Italy.
Description
FIELD

This disclosure relates to the field of plant breeding. In particular, this disclosure relates to a new tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) variety denominated ‘H1651’


BACKGROUND

Breeding improved tomato varieties involves providing genetics that give an advantage to the grower, processor, consumer, or other members of the supply chain. The improvement may be in the form of field performance, disease resistance, factory performance, or a fruit quality characteristic. For a tomato variety to be suitable to be grown for processing, the variety must have a concentrated fruit setting and maturity, firm fruit, and sufficient rot tolerance to allow early fruit to remain rot-free while later fruit continues to develop and ripen.


Most commercial processing tomato varieties are hybrids resulting from a cross pollination of two true-breeding, inbred parents. Through the use of true-breeding lines, a hybrid is produced that often displays characteristics of each parent, and often demonstrates characteristics that are superior to either parent alone, or that allow a hybrid to mask inadequacies of the individual parents.


SUMMARY

Provided herein is a new and distinct tomato variety named ‘H1651’ that was developed to provide a ground-culture hybrid tomato variety that is suitable for machine harvest, and is adaptable to the climactic conditions of regions such as California (USA), Ontario (Canada), Australia, Portugal, Spain, and Italy.


The present disclosure provides the improved tomato variety ‘H1651’ which demonstrates adaptability to arid and humid tomato production regions around the world. ‘H1651’ is strengthened by resistance to tomato spotted wilt virus. The variety ‘H1651’ has resistance to verticillium wilt race 1, fusarium wilt races 1 and 2, root knot nematode, and tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). The fruit of ‘H1651’ are large and of blocky-oval shape, have strong color, are very firm with an average fruit weight of 81 grams. Tolerance to fruit rot in ‘H1651’ is good, allowing for once-over machine harvesting applications requiring extended field storage.


In one embodiment, the present disclosure is directed to tomato seed designated as ‘H1651’ having ATCC Accession Number PTA-124672. In one aspect, the present disclosure is directed to a tomato plant, as well as any plant part or portion isolated therefrom, produced by growing ‘H1651’ tomato seed. In another embodiment, the present disclosure is directed to a tomato plant or part isolated therefrom having all the physiological, morphological and/or genetic characteristics of a tomato plant produced by growing ‘H1651’ tomato seed having ATCC Accession Number PTA-124672. In yet another aspect, the present disclosure is directed to a tomato plant having all of the characteristics of tomato variety ‘H1651’ listed in Table 1 below, wherein representative seed is deposited under ATCC Accession Number PTA-124672.


In another aspect, the present disclosure is directed to tomato seed having at least a first set of the chromosomes of tomato variety ‘H1651’, wherein representative seed is deposited under ATCC Accession Number PTA-124672. In yet another aspect, the present disclosure is directed to an F1 hybrid tomato seed, methods of making F1 hybrid tomato seed, plants grown from the seed, leaf, ovule, pollen, rootstock, scion, fruit, cotyledon, embryo, meristem, anther, root, root tip, pistil, flower, stem, calli, stalk, hypocotyla, pericarp, or portion thereof isolated therefrom having ‘H1651’ as a parent, wherein ‘H1651’ is grown from ‘H1651’ tomato seed having ATCC Accession Number PTA-124672. The disclosure is also directed to a method of producing a tomato plant derived from tomato variety ‘H1651’, including crossing a plant of tomato variety ‘H1651’ with another tomato plant. The method may further comprise harvesting seed from the F1 hybrid tomato seed and/or crossing the F1 hybrid tomato plant with itself or another plant to produce seed from a progeny plant.


Tomato plant parts include leaf, ovule, pollen, cell, rootstock, scion, fruit, cotyledon, embryo, meristem, anther, root, root tip, pistil, flower, stem, calli, stalk, hypocotyl, pericarp, the like, and any portion thereof. In another embodiment, the present disclosure is further directed to tomato fruit, stem, leaf, root, root tip, pollen, cell, rootstock, scion, ovule, seed, and flower, and any portion thereof, isolated from ‘H1651’ tomato plants. In another aspect, the present disclosure is further directed to tissue culture of regenerable cells derived from ‘H1651’ tomato plants. The disclosure is further directed to a tomato plant regenerated from tissue culture. In another aspect, the disclosure is directed to a protoplast produced from tissue culture and a plant regenerated from the protoplast. At least in some approaches, the plant regenerated from the tissue culture or protoplast has all of the characteristics of tomato variety ‘H1651’ listed in Table 1.


In another aspect, the disclosure is directed to a method for producing a plant part, which at least in one aspect is tomato fruit, and harvesting the plant part. The disclosure also is directed to vegetatively propagating a plant of tomato variety ‘H1651’ by obtaining a part of the plant and regenerating a plant from the plant part. At least in some approaches, the regenerated plant has all of the characteristics of tomato variety ‘H1651’ listed in Table 1.


In yet another aspect, the present disclosure is further directed to a method of selecting tomato plants by a) growing ‘H1651’ tomato plants wherein the ‘H1651’ plants are grown from tomato seed having ATCC Accession Number PTA-124672; and b) selecting a plant from step a). In another embodiment, the present disclosure is further directed to tomato plants, plant parts and seeds produced by the tomato plants, where the tomato plants are isolated by the selection method.


In another aspect, the present disclosure is further directed to a method of breeding tomato plants by crossing a tomato plant with a plant grown from ‘H1651’ tomato seed having ATCC Accession Number PTA-124672. In another aspect, the tomato plant of tomato variety ‘H1651’ is self-pollinated. In still another aspect, the present disclosure is further directed to tomato plants, tomato parts from the tomato plants, and seeds produced therefrom where the tomato plant is isolated by the breeding method.


In another aspect, the disclosure relates to a plant of tomato variety ‘H1651’ comprising a transgene and/or a single locus conversion, and any seeds or plant parts isolated therefrom. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing a plant of tomato variety ‘H1651’ comprising a transgene and/or a single locus conversion.





BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

The patent or application file contains at least one drawing executed in color. Copies of this patent or patent application publication with color drawings will be provided by the office upon request and payment of the necessary fee.


The FIGURE illustrates the fruit and plant of tomato variety ‘H1651’.





DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Described herein is a new and distinct tomato variety named ‘H1651’ that was developed to provide a ground-culture hybrid tomato variety (i.e., not grown on stakes) that is suitable for machine harvest, and is adaptable to the climactic conditions of regions such as California (USA), Ontario (Canada), Australia, Portugal, Spain, and Italy.


Processing tomato quality parameters differ from those of fruit used in the fresh market. The processing characteristics are typically determined using a sample of hot-break tomato pulp or juice produced in a consistent manner to those familiar with the art. For example, a fixed mass of tomatoes may be cooked in a microwave oven for several minutes to halt any enzymatic breakdown of the sample, lost water is replaced, and the sample is pulped to remove skins and seed to produce a uniform juice sample. The juice sample can be analyzed for various quality parameters important to processing tomato including but not limited to gross viscosity measures such as juice Bostwick, soluble solids measures using a refractometer (° Brix), measures of acidity and pH, and measures of color (e.g. Hunter a/b score and levels of lycopene). The value of these traits depends on the product that is being commercially produced by the processing factory. In some instances, a factory will put a higher value on a thick viscosity variety, whereas in other instances, a thin viscosity will make a superior product and is preferred.


Processing tomato varieties combining resistance to verticillium wilt race 1 (Verticillium dahlia), fusarium wilt race 1 and 2 (Fusarium oxysporum pv. lycopersici), and root knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) are highly desirable in most climates around the world. Varieties with tolerance to ripe fruit rots (extended field storage) are also desirable because they are conducive to once-over machine harvesting, particularly in regions where rain can occur during harvest or there are delays in a harvesting schedule.


Moreover, in regions such as California, the industry has seen a considerable increase in pressure from two particular diseases: tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Fusarium oxysporum pv. lycopersici race 3 (fusarium wilt race 3). Thus, varieties with resistance to either or both are in high demand by both growers and processors to ensure a productive crop cycle.


Processing tomato varieties that can produce high yields under intense pressure from bacterial diseases such as bacterial canker (Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis) and bacterial spot, caused by various Xanthomonas species, are highly desirable in humid tomato production regions around the world, such as Ohio, Michigan, and Brazil.


Moreover, an additional important contribution that tomatoes provide to the human diet is the antioxidant lycopene. Specifically, processed tomato products are the primary source of tomato intake in the US diet and other countries around the world. Higher levels of lycopene are beneficial both from a nutritional standpoint and from a consumer perception and quality standpoint. Tomato varieties having higher levels of lycopene result in products with a deeper red color that can be considered an indicator of higher product quality. Thus, a tomato variety with a higher level of lycopene and improved color in general can be valuable from a nutritional standpoint, a quality standpoint, and desirability by the consumer. However, to be commercially viable, the tomato variety must perform acceptably in the field and factory as required by any other processing tomato variety. Often, varieties with enhanced lycopene suffer agronomic defects in yield, fruit firmness, or field storage.


Hybrid Tomato Variety ‘H1651’


Described herein is a new and distinct tomato variety named ‘H1651’ that was developed to provide ground-culture hybrid tomato varieties (i.e., not grown on stakes) that is suitable for machine harvest, and is adaptable to the climactic conditions of regions such as California, USA; Portugal; Italy and Spain.


Tomato plants of ‘H1651’ are resistant to verticillium wilt race 1, fusarium wilt races 1, and 2, root knot nematode, bacterial speck, and tomato spotted wilt virus. Plants are darker green in color with a compact habit as compared to tomato varieties of the same market class. Fruit of ‘H1651’ are large (81 gram) for a processing variety, very firm, with a thick pericarp.


Stability of the Variety ‘H1651’


Variety ‘H1651’ is uniform and stable within commercially acceptable limits. As is true with other tomato varieties, a small percentage of variants can occur within commercially acceptable limits for almost any characteristic during the course of repeated multiplication. However, no variants were observed during the two years in which the variety was observed to be uniform and stable.


Hybrid tomato variety ‘H1651’ has the following physiological, morphological, and other characteristics as set forth in Tables 1-4 below.









TABLE 1







Characterization of tomato variety


‘H1651’ compared to industry standard ‘H5608’










Variety
Check Variety


Character
‘H1651’
‘H5608’










Seedling









Anthocyanin in hypocotyl:
Present
Present


Habit of 3-4 week old
Normal
Normal


seedling:







Mature Plant









Height (cm):
36
44


Growth Type:
Determinate
Determinate


Form:
Normal
Sprawling


Size of Canopy:
Large
Large


Habit:
Sprawling
Sprawling







Stem









Branching:
Profuse
Profuse


Branching at Cotyledon:
Absent
Absent


#nodes below first
4-7 nodes
4-7 nodes


inflorescence:


#nodes between early
1-2 nodes
1-2 nodes


inflorescence: (1st-2nd, 2nd-3rd)


# nodes between later
1-2 nodes
1-2 nodes


inflorescence


Pubescence on younger
Sparsely Hairy
Sparse


stems:







Leaf









Type:
Tomato
Tomato


Morphology:
Compound with
Compound with major



major and minor
and minor leaflets



leaflets (FIG. 2)


Margins of Major Leaflets:
Shallowly
Nearly entire



Toothed


Marginal Rolling or
Slight
Moderate


Wiltiness:


Onset of Leaflet Rolling:
Midseason
Midseason


Surface of Major Leaflets:
Rugose
Rugose


Pubescence
Normal
Normal







Inflorescence









Type:
Forked
Forked


# flowers in inflorescence
6
5


average:


leafy or “running”
Absent
Absent


inflorescence:







Flower









Calyx:
Normal
Normal


Calyx-Lobes:
Shorter than
Shorter than corolla



corolla


Corolla Color:
Yellow
Yellow


Style pubescence:
Sparse
Sparse


Anthers:
Fused/Tubed
Fused/Tubed


Fasciation:
Absent
Absent


1st flower of 2nd or 3rd
Absent
Absent


Inflorescence:







Fruit









Typical shape
Blocky oval
Blocky oval


in longitudinal section:


shape of transverse
Round
Round


section:


shape of stem end:
Indented
Indented


shape of blossom end:
Flat
Flat


shape of pistil scar:
Stellate
Dot


abscission layer:
Absent
Absent


point of detachment
At calyx
At calyx


fruit at harvest:


Length of pedicel
n/a
n/a


(joint to calyx attachment)


(cm):


Length of mature fruit
5.7
5.2


(cm)


(stem axis) (cm):


Diameter of fruit at widest
4.9
3.8


point (cm):


Weight of Mature Fruit (g):
81
73


Number of Locules
3-4
2-4


Fruit Surface:
Smooth
Smooth


Fruit Base Color (mature
Light green
Yellow green


green)


(Mature Green Stage):


Fruit Pattern (mature
Uniform
Uniform


green stage)


Shoulder color if different
n/a
n/a


from base


Fruit color full ripe:
Red
Red


Flesh color full ripe:
Red
Red


Flesh color:
Uniform
Uniform


Locular gel color of table-
Red
Yellow


ripe fruit


Ripening:
Uniform
Uniform


Ripening:
Uniformly
Uniformly


Stem Scar Size:
Small
small


Core:
Present
Coreless


Epidermis Color:
Yellow
Yellow


Epidermis:
Normal
Normal


Epidermis Texture:
Average
Tough


Thickness or Pericarp
7
8


(mm):


Resistance to Fruit
Not tested
Not tested


Disorder:







Disease and Pest Reactions


Viral Diseases









Cucumber Mosaic:
n/t
n/t


Curly Top:
n/t
n/t


Potato-y Virus:
n/t
n/t


Blotch Ripening:
n/t
n/t


Tobacco Mosaic Race 0:
n/t
n/t


Tobacco Mosaic Race 1:
n/t
n/t


Tobacco Mosaic Race 2:
n/t
n/t


Cracking, Concentric:
n/t
n/t


Tobacco Mosaic Race 22:
n/t
n/t


Tomato Spotted Wilt:
Resistant
Resistant


Tomato Yellows:
n/t
n/t


Gold Fleck:
n/t
n/t


Others:
n/t
n/t







Bacterial Disease









Bacterial Canker
susceptible
susceptible


(Clavibacter michiganense):


Bacterial Soft Rot (Erwinia
n/t
n/t



carotovora):



Bacteria Speck
Resistant
Resistant


(Pseudomonas tomato):


Bacterial Spot
susceptible
susceptible


(Xanthomonas spp):


Bacterial Wilt
n/t
n/t


(Ralstonia solanacearum):


Other Bacterial Disease:
n/t
n/t







Fungal Disease









Anthracnose
n/t
n/t


(Colletotrichum spp.):


Brown Root Rot or Corky
n/t
Susceptible


Root


(Pyrenochaeta lycopersici):


Collar Rot or Stem Canker
n/t
Susceptible


(Alternaria solani):


Early Blight Defoliation
Susceptible
Susceptible


(Alternaria solani):



Fusarium Wilt Race 1

Resistant
Resistant


(F. oxysporum f. lycopersici):



Fusarium Wilt Race 2

Resistant
Resistant


(F. oxysporum f. lycopersici):



Fusarium Wilt Race 3

Susceptible
Susceptible


(F. oxysporum f. lycopersici):


Grey Leaf Spot
n/t
n/t


(Stemphylium spp.):


Late Blight, race 0
Susceptible
Susceptible


(Phytophthora infestans)


Late Blight, race 1
n/t
n/t


(Phytophthora infestans)


Leaf Mold race 1
n/t
n/t


(Cladosporium fulvum):


Leaf Mold race 2
n/t
n/t


(Cladosporium fulvum):


Leaf Mold race 3
n/t
n/t


(Cladosporium fulvum):


Leaf Mold Other Races:
n/t
n/t


Nail-head Spot (Alternaria
n/t
n/t


tomato):



Septoria Leaf spot

n/t
n/t


(S. lycopersici):


Target Leaf spot
n/t
n/t


(Corynespora cassiicola):



Verticillium Wilt Race 1

Resistant
Resistant


(V. dahliae race 1):



Verticillium Wilt Race 2

n/t
Susceptible


(V. dahliae race 2):


Other Fungal Disease:
n/t
n/t







Insects and Pests









Colorado Potato Beetle
n/t
n/t


(L. decemlineata):


Root Knot Nematode (M.
Resistant
Resistant


sp.):


Spider Mites (Tetranychus
n/t
n/t


spp.):


Sugar Beet Army Worm
n/t
n/t


(s. exigua):


Tobacco Flea Beetle
n/t
n/t


(E. hiritipennis):


Tomato Hornworm
n/t
n/t


(M. quinquemaculata):


Tomato Fruit worm (H. zea):
n/t
n/t


Whitefly (T. Vaporariorum):
n/t
n/t


Other:
n/t
n/t










Chemistry and Composition of Full-Ripe Fruits









TABLE 2







Hot-break tomato juice characteristics













Check



Variety
Check Variety 1
Variety 2



‘H1651’
‘H5608’
‘H3402’














Serum viscosity (centistokes)
8.49
9.57
7.48


Juice Bostwick (cm)
11.84
11.03
13.13


Soluble solids (°Brix)
5.4
5.0
5.3


Lycopene (ppm)
132
133
119


Hunter a/b (1 year data)
2.26
2.28
2.25










Average of 2 years of trials in California in a total of 33 tests from 27 locations.









TABLE 3







Phenology











Variety
Check Variety 1
Check Variety 2



‘H1651’
‘H5608’
‘H3402’














Fruiting Season
short
short
short


Relative Maturity
medium
late
medium
















TABLE 4







Adaptation












Check
Check



Variety
Variety 1
Variety 2



‘H1651’
‘H5608’
‘H3402’














Culture
Field
Field
Field


Principle use
Whole-pack,
Whole-pack,
Whole-pack,



concentrated
Concentrated
Concentrated


Machine harvest
Yes
Yes
Yes







Regions of adaptability










California Sacramento/
Yes-1
Yes-2
Yes-2


upper San Joaquin valley


California lower San Joaquin
Yes-2
Yes-1
Yes-3


valley


Northeastern USA
No
No
Yes-1










If more than one category applies, they are listed in rank order.


Comparison of ‘H1651’ to Closest Varieties


Data in Tables 1, 3, and 4 are based primarily upon trials conducted in Collegeville, Calif. (USA) from two replications, non-staked, in a research plot environment. Comparisons among varieties for processing traits (Table 2) were done over two years of side-by side testing throughout California. Disease resistance and adaptability assessments are based upon numerous observations collected throughout California and in regions/climates with specific disease pressure for ripe fruit rots, bacterial spot, bacterial canker, early blight, and late blight, including Ontario (Canada).


Plants of ‘H1651’ are more compact than those of the industry standard, ‘H5608’ with larger leaflet size, and slightly less time until full crop maturity. The smaller plant size is a benefit for certain regions, particularly outside of California and for grower methods where a smaller plant is preferred such as Spain. The fruit chemistry difference of 0.4 higher ° Brix as shown in Table 2 provides a significant benefit over ‘H5608’ for processors interested in production of tomato paste or sauces where an intermediate viscosity is required. Fruit size and shape also make ‘H1651’ a superior peeling variety.


Further Embodiments

Additional methods include, without limitation, chasing selfs. Chasing selfs involves identifying inbred plants among tomato plants that have been grown from hybrid tomato seed. Once the seed is planted, the inbred plants may be identified and selected due to their decreased vigor relative to the hybrid plants that grow from the hybrid seed. By locating the inbred plants, isolating them from the rest of the plants, and self-pollinating them (i.e., “chasing selfs”), a breeder can obtain an inbred line that is identical to an inbred parent used to produce the hybrid. Accordingly, another aspect of the disclosure relates a method for producing an inbred tomato variety by: planting seed of the tomato variety ‘H1651’; growing plants from the seed; identifying one or more inbred tomato plants; controlling pollination in a manner which preserves homozygosity of the one or more inbred plants; and harvesting resultant seed from the one or more inbred plants. The step of identifying the one or more inbred tomato plants may further include identifying plants with decreased vigor, i.e., plants that appear less robust than plants of the tomato variety ‘H1651’. Tomato plants capable of expressing substantially all of the physiological and morphological characteristics of the parental inbred lines of tomato variety ‘H1651’ include tomato plants obtained by chasing selfs from seed of tomato variety ‘H1651’.


One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that once a breeder has obtained inbred tomato plants by chasing selfs from seed of tomato variety ‘H1651’, the breeder can then produce new inbred plants such as by sib-pollinating, or by crossing one of the identified inbred tomato plant with a plant of the tomato variety ‘H1651’.


The disclosure further includes introducing one or more desired traits into the tomato variety ‘H1651’. For example, the desired trait may include male sterility, male fertility, herbicide resistance, insect resistance, disease resistance, and drought resistance.


The desired trait may be found on a single gene or combination of genes. The desired trait may be a genetic locus that is a dominant or recessive allele. The genetic locus may be a naturally occurring tomato gene introduced into the genome of a parent of the variety by backcrossing, a natural or induced mutation, or a transgene introduced through genetic transformation techniques. For a genetic locus introduced through transformation, the genetic locus may comprise one or more transgenes integrated at a single chromosomal location. Accordingly, the disclosure provides tomato plants or parts thereof that have been transformed with one or more transgenes (i.e., a genetic locus comprising a sequence introduced into the genome of a tomato plant by transformation) to provide a desired trait. In one aspect, the one or more transgenes are operably linked to at least one regulatory element.


The gene(s) may be introduced to tomato variety ‘H1651’ through a variety of well-known techniques, including for example, molecular biological, other genetic engineering, or plant breeding techniques, such as recurrent selection, backcrossing, pedigree breeding, molecular marker (Isozyme Electrophoresis, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs), Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs), Arbitrarily Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction (AP-PCR), DNA Amplification Fingerprinting (DAF), Sequence Characterized Amplified Regions (SCARs), Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLPs), and Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) (also referred to as Microsatellites)), enhanced selection, genetic marker enhanced selection, and transformation. Accordingly, tomato seed, plants, and parts thereof produced by such genetic engineering or plant breed techniques are also part of the present disclosure.


Also provided herein are single locus converted plants and seeds developed by backcrossing wherein essentially all of the morphological and physiological characteristics of an inbred are recovered in addition to the characteristics conferred by the single locus transferred into the inbred via the backcrossing technique. A single locus may comprise one gene, or in the case of transgenic plants, one or more transgenes integrated into the host genome at a single site (locus). One or more locus conversion traits may be introduced into a single tomato variety.


DEPOSIT INFORMATION

A deposit of the tomato variety ‘H1651’ is maintained by HeinzSeed Company, having an address at 6755 CE Dixon St, Stockton, Calif. 95206, United States of America. Access to this deposit will be available during the pendency of this application to persons determined by the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks to be entitled thereto under 37 C.F.R. § 1.14 and 35 U.S.C. § 122.


At least 2,500 seeds of tomato variety ‘H1651’ were deposited on Dec. 12, 2017 according to the Budapest Treaty in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC), P.O. Box 1549, MANASSAS, Va. 20108 USA. The deposit has been assigned ATCC number PTA-124672. Access to this deposit will be available during the pendency of this application to persons determined by the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks to be entitled thereto under 37 C.F.R. § 1.14 and 35 U.S.C. § 122. Upon allowance of any claims in this application, all restrictions on the availability to the public of the variety will be irrevocably removed for the enforceable life of the patent.


The deposit will be maintained in the ATCC depository, which is a public depository, for a period of 30 years, or 5 years after the most recent request, or for the effective life of the patent, whichever is longer, and will be replaced if the deposit becomes nonviable during that period.

Claims
  • 1. Tomato seed designated as ‘H1651’, representative sample of seed having been deposited under ATCC Accession Number PTA-124672.
  • 2. A plant produced by growing the seed of claim 1.
  • 3. A plant part from the plant of claim 2, wherein the plant part comprises at least one cell from tomato variety ‘H1651’.
  • 4. The plant part of claim 3, wherein the part is selected from the group consisting of leaf, ovule, pollen, cell, rootstock, scion, fruit, cotyledon, meristem, anther, root, root tip, pistil, flower, stem, calli, stalk, hypocotyl, pericarp, and portion thereof.
  • 5. A tomato plant having all the physiological and morphological characteristics of the tomato plant of claim 2.
  • 6. A plant part from the plant of claim 5, wherein the plant part comprises at least one cell from tomato variety ‘H1651’.
  • 7. The plant part of claim 6, wherein the part is selected from the group consisting of leaf, ovule, pollen, cell, rootstock, scion, fruit, cotyledon, meristem, anther, root, root tip, pistil, flower, stem, calli, stalk, hypocotyl, pericarp, and portion thereof.
  • 8. A tomato plant having all the physiological and morphological characteristics of tomato variety ‘H1651’ listed in Table 1, wherein a representative sample of seed has been deposited under ATCC Accession Number PTA-124672.
  • 9. A plant part from the plant of claim 8, wherein the plant part comprises at least one cell from tomato variety ‘H1651’.
  • 10. The plant part of claim 9, wherein the part is selected from the group consisting of leaf, ovule, pollen, cell, rootstock, scion, fruit, cotyledon, meristem, anther, root, root tip, pistil, flower, stem, calli, stalk, hypocotyl, pericarp, and portion thereof.
  • 11. Pollen of the plant of claim 2.
  • 12. An ovule of the plant of claim 2.
  • 13. A tissue culture of regenerable cells from a plant part of claim 3, wherein said tissue culture comprises at least one cell of tomato variety ‘H1651’.
  • 14. A tomato plant regenerated from the tissue culture of claim 13, the plant having all the physiological and morphological characteristics of tomato variety ‘H1651’, wherein a representative sample of seed has been deposited under ATCC Accession Number PTA-124672.
  • 15. A protoplast produced from the tissue culture of claim 13, wherein a plant regenerated from the protoplast has all the physiological and morphological characteristics of tomato variety ‘H1651’.
  • 16. A method of producing a tomato plant derived from tomato variety ‘H1651’, the method comprising crossing the plant of claim 2 with another tomato plant to produce a F1 hybrid tomato plant.
  • 17. The method of claim 16, further comprising harvesting seed from the F1 hybrid tomato plant.
  • 18. The method of claim 16, further comprising crossing the F1 hybrid tomato plant with itself or another plant to produce seed from a progeny plant.
  • 19. The plant of claim 2, said plant having all the physiological and morphological characteristics of tomato variety ‘H1651’, further comprising a transgene.
  • 20. The plant of claim 2, said plant having all the physiological and morphological characteristics of tomato variety ‘H1651’, further comprising a single locus conversion.
  • 21. A method for producing a tomato fruit, the method comprising: growing the tomato plant of claim 2 to produce a tomato fruit; andharvesting the tomato fruit.
  • 22. A method for producing a tomato seed comprising: self-pollinating the tomato plant of claim 2; andharvesting the resultant tomato seed.
  • 23. A method of vegetatively propagating the plant of claim 2, the method comprising: obtaining a part of the plant; andregenerating a plant from the part, the regenerated plant having all the physiological and morphological characteristics of tomato variety ‘H1651’.
US Referenced Citations (2)
Number Name Date Kind
6759573 Olhoft Jul 2004 B2
7910811 Ramon Mar 2011 B2
Related Publications (1)
Number Date Country
20190053449 A1 Feb 2019 US
Provisional Applications (1)
Number Date Country
62546932 Aug 2017 US