Methods of treatment with antagonists against PD-1 and PD-L1 in combination with radiation therapy

Information

  • Patent Grant
  • 10092645
  • Patent Number
    10,092,645
  • Date Filed
    Tuesday, June 16, 2015
    3 years ago
  • Date Issued
    Tuesday, October 9, 2018
    2 months ago
Abstract
This application provides a method of treating cancer in a patient comprising administering at least one dose of radiation therapy and at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist, wherein at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on the same day as a dose of radiation therapy or up to and including 4 days later.
Description
SEQUENCE LISTING

The instant application contains a Sequence Listing which has been submitted electronically in ASCII format and is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. Said ASCII copy, created on Jun. 16, 2015, is named B7H1-275US1_SL.txt and is 101,340 bytes in size.


FIELD

Methods of treatment for cancer.


BACKGROUND

Radiation therapy (RT) remains the most important non-surgical treatment in the management of solid malignancies with around 50-60% of all cancer patients receiving this treatment. The inclusion of RT in treatment regimens reduces disease recurrence and improves overall survival in the majority of common cancers (1-3). Although effective, many patients suffer from local recurrence and metastatic disease.


In addition to the direct cytoreductive effect of RT, emerging evidence suggests that the generation of anti-tumor immune responses may play an important role in the effectiveness of this treatment (4, 5). RT can lead to expression of ecto-calreticulin on tumor cells as well as the release of several damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) including High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) and ATP which can lead to recruitment and activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and priming of tumor antigen-specific T cell responses (6-10). Despite this immune-escape frequently occurs, with tumor recurrence remaining the leading cause of mortality in patients receiving RT (11). The identification and inhibition of key drivers of immunosuppression may augment anti-tumor immune responses with the potential to improve patient outcome.


New insights into treatment failure and more effective RT combination approaches are therefore urgently required.


The programmed death 1 (PD-1)/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) axis is involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance and the modulation of acute inflammatory responses through inhibition of T cell function and through apoptosis of activated T cells (12, 13). In addition to binding PD-1, PD-L1 can also suppress T cell function through interaction with CD80 (14). Expression of PD-L1 is inducible and thought to respond to local inflammatory milieu, particularly type I and II interferon (IFN) (12, 15, 16). Although barely detectable in most normal tissues, expression of PD-L1 has been described in multiple malignancies (reviewed in (17)). Importantly, recent clinical studies with either PD-1 or PD-L1 targeting monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have demonstrated encouraging responses in patients with advanced disease (18-21).


A dosing strategy for combining radiation therapy and a PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is desired to create maximal benefit for patients suffering from cancer.


SUMMARY

In accordance with the description, a method of treating cancer in a patient comprises

    • a. administering at least one dose of radiation therapy; and
    • b. administering at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist, wherein at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on the same day as a dose of radiation therapy or up to and including 4 days later.


In another mode, the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is an at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antibody or functional part thereof.


In one aspect, the radiation therapy is fractionated radiation therapy. In one mode, the fractionated radiation therapy comprises from 2 to 7 fractions. In another mode, the fractionated radiation therapy comprises 5 fractions.


In one embodiment, the radiation therapy fractions are administered in sequential days. In another embodiment, the radiation therapy fractions are administered on day 1, day 2, day 3, day 4, and day 5. In one embodiment, the radiation therapy comprises about 10 Gy in 5 fractions.


In one aspect, the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on at least day 1 and/or on day 5. In one mode, the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered multiple times. For example, the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist may be administered 3 times a week.


In one embodiment, the anti-PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antibody or functional part thereof is MEDI4736.


In another embodiment, the anti-PD-1 and/or anti-PD-L1 antibody or functional part thereof is pembrolizumab, nivolumab, BMS-936558, AMP-224, or MPDL3280A.


In one aspect, the cancer is melanoma, colorectal cancer, or breast cancer. In another aspect, more than one treatment cycle is performed. In a further aspect, from 2-8 treatment cycles are performed. In one mode, treatment cycles are weekly or every other week.


Additional objects and advantages will be set forth in part in the description which follows, and in part will be obvious from the description, or may be learned by practice. The objects and advantages will be realized and attained by means of the elements and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims.


It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are exemplary and explanatory only and are not restrictive of the claims.


The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate one (several) embodiment(s) and together with the description, serve to explain the principles described herein.





BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS


FIGS. 1A-1F illustrate that blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis potentiates the activity of fractionated radiation therapy. A and B, median fluorescence intensity (FIG. 1A) and representative histograms (FIG. 1B) of PD-L1 expression on CT26 cells isolated from tumors 1, 3 or 7 days after treatment with about 10 Gy in 5 daily fractions of 2 Gy. C and D, CT26 tumor bearing mice received about 10 Gy RT delivered in 5 daily fractions of 2 Gy either alone or in combination with either αPD-1 (FIG. 1C) or αPD-L1 (FIG. 1D) mAb dosed at 10 mg/kg 3qw for up to 3 weeks. FIG. 1E, tumor volumes 10 days after the start of therapy in 4T1 tumor bearing mice that received 20 Gy RT delivered in 5 daily fractions of 4 Gy either alone or in combination with αPD-L1 mAb. FIG. 1F, 4434 tumor bearing mice received about 10 Gy RT delivered in 5 daily fractions of 2 Gy either alone or in combination with αPD-L1 mAb. Experimental groups contained at least 7 mice and are representative of at least 2 independent experiments. A, E and F show mean±SEM. *, P<0.05 **, P<0.01, Mann-Whitney test. In FIGS. 1C and 1D, *, denotes significance when compared to control mice. +, denotes significance when compared to monotherapy. ***/+++, P<0.001, Log rank (Mantel-Cox) test.



FIGS. 2A-2C demonstrate that therapeutic activity of fractionated RT and αPD-L1 mAb combination is dependent on the activity of CD8+ T-lymphocytes. FIG. 2A, tumor volume on day of therapy, 7 and 11 days post combination therapy with 5 fractions of 2 Gy and αPD-L1 mAb. Immune cell subsets (either CD8, CD4 or NK cell) were depleted 1 day prior to therapy with depletion maintained for 2 weeks. ***, P>0.001, *, P>0.01, *, P>0.05, Mann-Whitney test. FIG. 2B, Survival curve. ***/+++, P<0.001, Log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test. Data representative of 10 mice per cohort. FIG. 2C, representative density plots of peripheral blood confirming depletion of immune cell subsets.



FIGS. 3A-3C show that fractionated RT and αPD-L1 mAb combination generates protective immunological memory. FIG. 3A, Survival curve of LTS mice following contralateral rechallenge with 5×105 CT26 cells. *P<0.05 compared to control mice (log-rank; Mantel-Cox test). FIG. 3B, representative dot blot of IFNγ production by CD8+ T cells isolated from either tumor naïve, or LTS mice originally treated with RT and αPD-L1 mAb. FIG. 3C, frequency of IFNγ+ CD8+ T cells isolated from either tumor naïve, or LTS mice originally treated with RT and αPD-L1 mAb following co-culture with either H2-Ld restricted peptides (AH1 (SPSYVYHQF) (SEQ ID NO: 91); a defined CT26 tumor-associated antigen or β-galactosidase (TPHPARIGL) (SEQ ID NO: 92); control peptide of prokaryotic origin) or 50 Gy irradiated CT26 cells for 5 days, followed by priming with 50 Gy irradiated CT26 cells. *P<0.05 (Mann-Whitney test). Data representative of 2 independent experiments.



FIGS. 4A-4C illustrate that fractionated RT increases tumor cell PD-L1 expression in vivo and is dependent on CD8+ T cells. FIG. 4A, Expression of PD-L1 on CT26 cells post treatment with RT (2.5-10Gy) in vitro. FIGS. 4B and 4C, Representative contour plots (FIG. 4B) and median fluorescence intensity (FIG. 4C) of PD-L1 expression on CT26 cells (gated as CD45cells) isolated from tumors 3 days after receiving about 10 Gy in 5 daily fractions of 2Gy in combination with either CD8, CD4 or NK cell depleting antibodies. *P<0.05 (Mann-Whitney test). Experimental groups contained at least 5 mice and are representative of at least 2 independent experiments.



FIGS. 5A-5E show that CD8+ T cell production of IFNγ is responsible for the upregulation of PD-L1 expression on tumor cells following fractionated RT. FIG. 5A, Expression of PD-L1 on wild-type CT26 tumor cells (WT), or cells transduced with either a non-targeting control (NTC) or IFNγR1 ShRNA following co-culture for 24 hours with either 20 ng/ml IFNγ, TNFα or a combination of both cytokines FIG. 5B, representative density plots showing expression of IFNγ and TNFα by CD8+ T cells following treatment with either PBS or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin, FIG. 5C, Frequency of PD-L1 positive CT26 tumor cells (WT, NTC ShRNA or IFNγR1 ShRNA) following 24 hour co-culture with either PBS or PMA/ionomycin activated splenocytes. n/s=P>0.05, ***P<0.001 **P<0.01 (2-tailed Student t test). FIGS. 5D and 5E, representative contour plots (FIG. 5D) and median fluorescence intensity (FIG. 5E) of PD-L1 expression on CT26 tumor cells following treatment with RT (about 10 Gy in 5 fractions) in the presence of an αIFNγ blocking mAb (or isotype control) in vivo. **P<0.01, (Mann-Whitney test). Experimental groups contained at least 5 mice.



FIGS. 6A-6D demonstrate that dosing schedule impacts outcomes with RT potentiation only observed with concurrent but not sequential αPD-L1 mAb therapy. FIG. 6A, Schema for dose-scheduling studies. Mice received fractionated dose RT (as about 10 Gy in 5 daily fractions of 2 Gy) alone or in combination with αPD-L1 mAb starting either on day 1 of RT cycle (schedule A), day 5 of RT cycle (schedule B) or 7 days post the last dose of RT (Schedule C). FIG. 6B, Survival curves of therapy. ++, P<0.01 compared to monotherapy (log-rank; Mantel-Cox test). FIGS. 6C and 6D, Expression of PD-1 on CD4+ (FIG. 6C) and CD8+ (FIG. 6D) T cells 24 hours and 7 days after the last dose of RT. *P<0.05 (Mann-Whitney test). Experimental groups contained at least 5 mice and are representative of at least 2 independent experiments.



FIG. 7 shows blockade of both PD-1 and PD-L1 does not further enhance efficacy in combination with fractionated RT in CT26-tumor bearing mice. A) Survival curve following fractionated dose RT (as 10 Gy in 5 daily fractions of 2 Gy) alone or in combination with αPD-1, αPD-L1 or a combination of both mAb dosed 3qw for 3 weeks. n/s, P>0.05, log-rank; Mantel-Cox test. Experimental groups contained at least 5 mice and are representative of at 2 independent experiments.



FIGS. 8A-8B show combination therapy with fractionated RT and either αPD-1 or αPD-L1 mAb is well tolerated in mice. CT26 tumor bearing mice received 10 Gy RT delivered in 5 daily fractions of 2 Gy either alone or in combination with αPD-L1 mAb dosed at 10 mg/kg 3qw either for 3 weeks or 1 week. Experimental groups contained at least 7 mice and are representative of at least 2 independent experiments. n/s, P>0.05, Mann-Whitney test.



FIGS. 9A-9C illustrate that treatment of tumor cells with αPD-1 or αPD-L1 mAb does not sensitise to radiation-induced cell death in vitro. Clonogenic survival curves for CT26 cells (FIG. 9A), 4T1 cells (FIG. 9B) and 4434 cells (FIG. 9C) treated with RT (2.5-10Gy) in the presence absence of 2 μg/ml αPD1 or αPD-L1.



FIGS. 10A-10C show that the dosing schedule impacts outcome. FIG. 10A) tumour volumes following fractionated dose RT (as 10 Gy in 5 daily fractions of 2 Gy) alone or in combination with αPD-L1 mAb starting either on day 1 of RT cycle (schedule A), day 5 of RT cycle (schedule B) or 7 days post the last dose of RT (Schedule C). FIGS. 10B and 10C) tumour volumes of RT-treated mice demonstrating equivalent tumor volumes across different dosing schedules. n/s, P>0.05 (Mann-Whitney test). Experimental groups contained at least 5 mice and are representative of at 2 independent experiments.



FIG. 11 shows that acute versus chronic administration of αPD-L1 mAb does not impact efficacy of combination therapy. A, CT26 tumor bearing mice received 10 Gy RT delivered in 5 daily fractions of 2 Gy either alone or in combination with αPD-L1 mAb dosed at 10 mg/kg 3qw either for 3 weeks or 1 week. Experimental groups contained at least 7 mice and are representative of at least 2 independent experiments. n/s, P>0.05, log-rank; Mantel-Cox test.





DESCRIPTION OF THE SEQUENCES

Table 1 provides a listing of certain sequences referenced in present embodiments. CDRs have been indicated in bold and underlining.












TABLE 1










SEQ ID



Description
Sequence
NO






2.7A4 VH
EVQLVESGGGLVKPGGSLRLS
 1




CAASGFTFSTYSMNWVRQAPG





KGLEWVSSISSSGDYIYYADS







VKG
RFTISRDNAKNSLFLQMN






SLKAEDTAVYYCARDLVTSMV







AFDY
WGQGTLVTVSS








2.7A4 VL
TCSGDALPQKYVFWYQQKSGQ
 2




APVLVIYEDSKRPSGIPERFS





GSSSGTMATLTISGAQVEDEA





DYYCYSTDRSGNHRVFGGGTR





LTVL







2.9D10 VH
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGGSLRLS
 3




CAASGFTFSSYWMSWVRQAPG





KGLEWVANIKQDGGEQYYVDS







VKG
RFTISRDNAKNSLYLQMN






SLRAEDTAVYYCARDWNYGYY







DMDV
WGQGTTVTVSS








2.9D10 VL
EIVLTQSPGTLSLSPGERATL
 4




SCRASQSVSSNYLAWFQQKPG





QAPRLLIFGTSSRATGIPDRF





SGSGSGTDFTLTISRLEPEDF





AVYYCQQYGSSIFTFGPGTKV





DIK







2.14H9 VH
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGGSLRLS
 5




CAASGFTFSRYWMSWVRQAPG





KGLEWVANIKQDGSEKYYVDS







VKG
RFTISRDNAKNSLYLQMN






SLRAEDTAVYYCAREGGWFGE







LAFDY
WGQGTLVTVSS








2.14H9 VL
EIVLTQSPGTLSLSPGERATL
 6




SCRASQRVSSSYLAWYQQKPG





QAPRLLIYDASSRATGIPDRF





SGSGSGTDFTLTISRLEPEDF





AVYYCQQYGSLPWTFGQGTEV





EIK







2.20A8 VH
EVQLLESGGGLVQPGGSLRLS
 7




CAASGFTFSNYAMSWVRQAPG





KGLEWVSAIRGSGGSTYYADS







VKG
RFTISRDNSKNTLYLQMN






SLRAEDTAVYYCAKDLHYDSS







GYLDY
WGQGTLVTVSS








2.20A8 VL
DIQMTQSPSSVSASVGDRVTI
 8




TCRASQGIRSWLAWYQQKPGK





APKLLIYAISRLQSGVPSRFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLQPEDFA





TYYCQQANSFPLTFGGGTKVE





IK







3.15G8 VH
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGGSLRLS
 9




CAASGFTFSSYWMSWVRQAPG





KGLEWVANIKQDGGEKYYVDS







VKG
RFTISRDNAKNSLFLQMN






SLRAEDTAVYYCARVQLYSDY





FDYWGQGTLVTVSS







3.15G8 VL
DIQMTQSPSSVSASVGDRVTI
10




TCRASQGISSWLAWYQQKSGK





APKLLIYAASGLQSGVPSRFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLQPEDLA





TYYCQQSHSLPPTFGQGTKVE





IK







3.18G1 VH
EVQLLESGGDLVQPGGSLRLS
11




CAASGFTFNSYAMSWVRQAPG





KGLEWVSTISGSGGFTFSADS







VKG
RFTISRDNSKNTLFLQMN






SLRVEDSAVYSCAKVLVGFNN







GCWDY
WGQGTLVTVSS








3.18G1 VL
SYVLTQPPSVSVAPGQTARIT
12




CGGNNIGSKSVHWYQQKPGQA





PVLVVYDDSDRPSGIPERFSG





SNSGNTATLTISRVEAGDEAD





YYCQVWDSSNDHVVFGGGTKL





TVL







2.7A4 OPT VH
EVQLVESGGGLVKPGGSLRLS
13




CAASGFTFSTYSMNWVRQAPG





KGLEWVSSISSSGDYIYYADS







VKG
RFTISRDNAKNSLYLQMN






SLRAEDTAVYYCARDLVTSMV







AFDY
WGQGTLVTVSS








2.7A4 OPT
SYELTQPPSVSVSPGQTARIT
14



VL
CSGDALPQKYVFWYQQKSGQA





PVLVIYEDSKRPSGIPERFSG





SSSGTMATLTISGAQVEDEAD





YYCYSTDRSGNHRVFGGGTKL





TVL







2.14H9 OPT
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGGSLRLS
15



VH
CAASGFTFSRYWMSWVRQAPG





KGLEWVANIKQDGSEKYYVDS







VKG
RFTISRDNAKNSLYLQMN






SLRAEDTAVYYCAREGGWFGE







LAFDY
WGQGTLVTVSS








2.14H9 OPT
EIVLTQSPGTLSLSPGERATL
16



VL
SCRASQRVSSSYLAWYQQKPG





QAPRLLIYDASSRATGIPDRF





SGSGSGTDFTLTISRLEPEDF





AVYYCQQYGSLPWTFGQGTKV





EIK







1E12 VH
EVKLQESGPS LVKPSQTLSL
17



(anti-PD-L1)
TCSVTGYSIT SDYWNWIRKF





PGNKLEYVGY ISYTGSTYYN







PSLKS
RISIT RDTSKNQYYL






QLNSVTSEDT ATYYCARYGG







WLSPF
DYWGQ GTTLTVSS








1E12 VL
DIVMTQSHKL MSTSVGDRVS
18



(anti-PD-L1)
ITCKASQDVG TAVAWYQQKP





GQSPKLLIYW ASTRHTGVPD





RFTGSGSGTD FTLTISNVQS





EDLADYFCQQ DSSYPLTFGA





GTKVELK







1F4 VH
EVQLQESGPG LVAPSQSLSI
19



(anti-PD-L1)
TCTVSGFSLT TYSINWIRQP





PGKGLEWLGV MWAGGGTNSN







SVLKS
RLIIS KDNSKSQVFL






KMNSLQTDDT ARYYCARYYG







NSPYYAI
DYW GQGTSVTVSS








1F4 VL
DIVTTQSHKL MSTSVGDRVS
20



(anti-PD-L1)
ITCKASQDVG TAVAWYQQKP





GQSPKLLIYW ASTRHTGVPD





RFTGSGSGTD FTLTISNVQS





EDLADYFCQQ DSSYPLTFGA





GTKVELK







2G11 VH
EVKLQESGPS LVKPSQTLSL
21



(anti-PD-L1)
TCSVTGYSII SDYWNWIRKF





PGNKLEYLGY ISYTGSTYYN







PSLKS
RISIT RDTSKNQYYL






QLNSVTTEDT ATYYCARRGG







WLLPF
DYWGQ GTTLTVSS








2G11 VL
DIVMTQSPSS LAVSVGEKVS
22



(anti-PD-L1)
MGCKSSQSLL YSSNQKNSLA





WYQQKPGQSP KLLIDWASTR







ES
GVPDRFTG SGSGTDFTLT






ISSVKAEDLA VYYCQQYYGY







PLT
FGAGTKL ELK








3B6 VH
EVKLQESGPS LVKPGASVKL
23



(anti-PD-L1)
SCKASGYTFT SYDINWVKQR





PGQGLEWIGW IFPRDNNTKY







NENFKG
KATL TVDTSSTTAY






MELHSLTSED SAVYFCTKEN







WVGDF
DYWGQ GTTLTLSS








3B6 VL
DIVMTQSPAI MSASPGEKVT
24



(anti-PD-L1)
MTCSASSSIR YMHWYQQKPG





TSPKRWISDT SKLTSGVPAR





FSGSGSGTSY ALTISSMEAE





DAATYYCHQR SSYPWTFGGG





TKLEIK







3D10 VH
EVQLQQSGPD LVTPGASVRI
25



(anti-PD-L1)
SCQASGYTFP DYYMNWVKQS





HGKSLEWIGD IDPNYGGTTY







NQKFKG
KAIL TVDRSSSTAY






MELRSLTSED SAVYYCARGA







L
TDWGQGTSL TVSS








3D10 VL
QIVLSQSPAI LSASPGEKVT
26



(anti-PD-L1)
MTCRASSSVS YIYWFQQKPG





SSPKPWIYAT FNLASGVPAR





FSGSGSGTSY SLTISRVETE





DAATYYCQQW SNNPLTFGAG





TKLELK







1E3 VH
EVQLQQSGPV LVKPGASVKM
27



(anti-PD-1)
SCKASGYTFT DYYMNWVKQS





HGKSLEWIGN INPYNGGTTY







NQKFKG
KATL TVDKSSRTAY






MEINSLTSED SAVYYCARGR







IYDGSLDY
WG QGTALTVSS








1E3 VL
DIQMTQFPSS LCASQGGKVT
28



(anti-PD-1)
VTCKASQDIN NYMAWYQHKP





GKGPRLLIHY TSTLLSGIPS





RFSGSGSGRD YSFSISNLEP





EDIATYYCLQ YDNLWTFGGG





TKLEIK







1E8 VH
QVQLQQSGAE LAKPGASVRL
29



(anti-PD-1)
SCKASGYTFT NYWMHWVKQR





PGQGLEWIGH INPSSGFTTY







NQNFKD
KATL TADKSSNTAY






MQLSSLTYED SAVYFCARED







YDVDY
WGQGT TLTVSS








1E8 VL
DIVMTQSQKF MSTSVGDRVS
30



(anti-PD-1)
VTCKASQSVD TNVAWYQQKP





GQSPKALIFS ASYRYSGVPD





RFTGSGSGTD FTLTINSVQS





EDLAEYFCQQ YNSYPYTFGS





GTKLEIK







1H3 VH
EVQLVESGGG LVKPGGSLKL
31



(anti-PD-1)
SCAASGFTFS DYGMHWVRQA





PEKGLEWVAY ISSGSYTIYY







TDTVKG
RFTI SRDNAKNTLF






LQMTSLRSED TAMYYCARRG







YGSFYEYYFD Y
WGQGTTLTV






SS







1H3 VL
QIVLTQSPAL MSASPGEKVT
32



(anti-PD-1)
MTCSASSSVS YMYWYQQKPR





SSPKPWIYLT SNLASGVPAR





FSGSGSGTSY SLTISSMEAE





DAATYYCQQW SSNPFTFGSG





TKLEIK







Humanized
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGASVKVS
33



Anti-Human
CKASGYTFPDYYMNWVRQAPG




B7-H1 Heavy
QGLEWMGDIDPNYGGTNYAQK




Chain HC1_1
FQGRVTMTRDTSISTAYMELS





RLRSDDTAVYYCARGALTDWG





QGTMVTVSS







Humanized
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGASVKVS
34



Anti-Human
CKASGYTFPDYYMNWVRQAPG




B7-H1 Heavy
QSLEWMGDIDPNYGGTNYNQK




Chain HC1_2
FQGRVTMTRDTSISTAYMELS





RLRSDDTAVYYCARGALTDWG





QGTMVTVSS







Humanized
EVQLVQSGAEVKKPGASVKVS
35



Anti-Human
CKASGYTFPDYYMNWVRQAPG




B7-H1 Heavy
QSLEWMGDIDPNYGGTNYNQK




Chain HC1_3
FQGRVTMTVDRSSSTAYMELS





RLRSDDTAVYYCARGALTDWG





QGTMVTVSS







Humanized
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGRSLRLS
36



Anti-Human
CTASGYTFPDYYMNWVRQAPG




B7-H1 Heavy
KGLEWVGDIDPNYGGTTYAAS




Chain HC2_1
VKGRFTISVDRSKSIAYLQMS





SLKTEDTAVYYCTRGALTDWG





QGTMVTVSS







Humanized
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGRSLRLS
37



Anti-Human
CTASGYTFPDYYMNWVRQAPG




B7-H1 Heavy
KGLEWVGDIDPNYGGTTYNAS




Chain HC2_2
VKGRFTISVDRSKSIAYLQMS





SLKTEDTAVYYCARGALTDWG





QGTMVTVSS







Humanized
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGRSLRLS
38



Anti-Human
CTASGYTFPDYYMNWVRQAPG




B7-H1 Heavy
KGLEWVGDIDPNYGGTTYNQS




Chain HC2_3
VKGRFTISVDRSKSIAYLQMS





SLKTEDTAVYYCARGALTDWG





QGTMVTVSS







Humanized
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
39



Anti-Human
SCRASSSVSYIYWFQQKPGQA




B7-H1 Light
PRLLIYAAFNRATGIPARFSG




Chain LC1_1
SGSGTDYTLTISSLEPEDFAV





YYCQQWSNNPLTFGQGTKVEI





K







Humanized
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
40



Anti-Human
SCRASSSVSYIYWFQQKPGQS




B7-H1 Light
PRPLIYAAFNRATGIPARFSG




Chain LC1_2
SGSGTDYTLTISSLEPEDFAV





YYCQQWSNNPLTFGQGTKVEI





K







Humanized
QIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
41



Anti-Human
SCRASSSVSYIYWFQQKPGQS




B7-H1 Light
PRPLIYATFNLASGIPARFSG




Chain LC1_3
SGSGTSYTLTISRLEPEDFAV





YYCQQWSNNPLTFGQGTKVEI





K







Humanized
DIQLTQSPSSLSASVGDRVTI
42



Anti-Human
TCRASSGVSYIYWFQQKPGKA




B7-H1 Light
PKLLIYAAFNLASGVPSRFSG




Chain LC2_1
SGSGTEYTLTISSLQPEDFAT





YYCQQWSNNPLTFGQGTKVEI





K







Humanized
DIQLTQSPSSLSASVGDRVTI
43



Anti-Human
TCRASSGVSYIYWFQQKPGKA




B7-H1 Light
PKPLIYAAFNLASGVPSRFSG




Chain LC2_2
SGSGTEYTLTISSLQPEDFAT





YYCQQWSNNPLTFGQGTKVEI





K







Humanized
DIQLTQSPSILSASVGDRVTI
44



Anti-Human
TCRASSSVSYIYWFQQKPGKA




B7-H1 Light
PKPLIYATFNLASGVPSRFSG




Chain LC2_3
SGSGTSYTLTISSLQPEDFAT





YYCQQWSNNPLTFGQGTKVEI





K







Humanized
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGGSLRLS
45



Anti-Human
CAASGFTFSDYGMHWVRQAPG




PD-1 Heavy
KGLEWVSYISSGSSTIYYADS




Chain HC1_1
VKGRFTISRDNAKNTLYLQMS





SLRAEDTAVYYCARRGYGSFY





EYYFDYWGQGTTVTVSS







Humanized
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGGSLRLS
46



Anti-Human
CAASGFTFSDYGMHWVRQAPG




PD-1 Heavy
KGLEWVAYISSGSYTIYYADS




Chain HC1_2
VKGRFTISRDNAKNTLYLQMS





SLRAEDTAVYYCARRGYGSFY





EYYFDYWGQGTTVTVSS







Humanized
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGGSLRLS
47



Anti-Human
CAASGFTFSDYGMHWVRQAPG




PD-1 Heavy
KGLEWVAYISSGSYTIYSADS




HC1_3
VKGRFTISRDNAKNTLYLQMS





SLRAEDTAVYYCARRGYGSFY





EYYFDYWGQGTTLTVSS*







Humanized
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGASVKVS
48



Anti-Human
CKASGFTFSDYGMHWVRQAPG




PD-1 Heavy
QRLEWMGYISSGSSTIYYSQK




HC2_1
FQGRVTITRDNSASTLYMELS





SLRSEDTAVYYCARRGYGSFY





EYYFDYWGQGTTLTVSS







Humanized
EVQLVQSGAEVKKPGASVKVS
49



Anti-Human
CAASGFTFSDYGMHWVRQAPG




PD-1 Heavy
QRLEWMGYISSGSYTIYYSQK




HC2_2
FQGRVTITRDNSASTLYMELS





SLRSEDTAVYYCARRGYGSFY





EYYFDYWGQGTTLTVSS







Humanized
EVQLVQSGAEVKKPGASVKVS
50



Anti-Human
CAASGFTFSDYGMHWVRQAPG




PD-1 Heavy
QRLEWVAYISSGSYTIYYSQK




HC2_3
FQGRVTITRDNSASTLYMELS





SLRSEDTAVYYCARRGYGSFY





EYYFDYWGQGTTLTVSS







Humanized
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
51



Anti-Human
SCRASSSVSYMYWYQQKPGQA




PD-1 Light
PRLLIYLASNRATGIPARFSG




LC1_1
SGSGTDYTLTISSLEPEDFAV





YYCQQWSSNPFTFGQGTKLEI





K







Humanized
QIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
52



Anti-Human
SCSASSSVSYMYWYQQKPGQA




PD-1 Light
PRLLIYLTSNRATGIPARFSG




LC1_2
SGSGTDYTLTISSLEPEDFAV





YYCQQWSSNPFTFGQGTKLEI





K







Humanized
DIQLTQSPSSLSASVGDRVTI
53



Anti-Human
TCRASSSVSYMYWYQQKPGKA




PD-1 Light
PKLLIYLASNLASGVPSRFSG




LC2_1
SGSGTEYTLTISSLEPEDFAT





YYCQQWSSNPFTFGQGTKLEI





K







Humanized
QIQLTQSPSSLSASVGDRVTI
54



Anti-Human
TCSASSSVSYMYWYQQKPGKA




PD-1 Light
PKLLIYLTSNLASGVPSRFSG




LC2_2
SGSGTEYTLTISSLEPEDFAT





YYCQQWSSNPFTFGQGTKLEI





K
















Certain







Specific

Light
Heavy




Combinations
Antibody
Chain
Chain







h1H3 Var 1
LC1_1
HC1_1





h1H3 Var 2
LC1_1
HC1_2





h1H3 Var 3
LC1_1
HC1_3





h1H3 Var 4
LC1_2
HC1_1





h1H3 Var 5
LC1_2
HC1_2





h1H3 Var 6
LC1_2
HC1_3





h1H3 Var 7
LC2_1
HC2_1





h1H3 Var 8
LC2_1
HC2_2





h1H3 Var 9
LC2_1
HC2_3





h1H3 Var 10
LC2_2
HC2_1





h1H3 Var 11
LC2_2
HC2_2





h1H3 Var 12
LC2_2
HC2_2





h1H3 Var 13
LC1_1
HC1_1





h1H3 Var 14
LC2_1
HC2_1
















SEQ ID



Description
Sequence
NO






17D8 VH (#1)
QVQLVESGGDVVQPGGSLRLS
55




CAASGVAFSNYGMHWVRQAPG





KGLEWVAVIWYDGSNKYYADS





VKGRFTISRDNSKNMLYLQMN





SLRAEDTAMYYCARNDDYWGQ





GTLVTVSS







17D8 VL (#8)
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
56




SCRASQSVSSYLAWYQQKPGQ





APRLIIYDASNRATGIPARFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFA





VYYCQQRSNWPLTFGGGTKVE





IK







2D3 VH (#2)
QVQLVESGGDVVQPGRSLRLS
57




CAASGLTFTNYGFHWVRQAPG





KGLEWVAVIWYDGSKKYYADS





VKGRFTISRDNSKNTLYLQMN





NLRAEDTAVYYCATGDDYWGQ





GTLVTVSS







2D3 VL (#9)
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
58




SCRASQSVSSYLAWYQQKPGQ





APRLLIYDTSNRATGIPARFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFA





VYYCQQRSNWPLTFGGGTKVE





IK







4H1 VH 3
QVYLVESGGGVVQPGRSLRLS
59




CAASGFTFSNYGMHWVRQAPG





KGLEWVALIWYDGSNKYYADS





VKGRFTISRDNSKNTLYLQMT





SLRVEDTAVYYCASNVDHWGQ





GTLVTVSS







4H1 Vl 10
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
60




SCRASQSVSSYLAWYQQKPGQ





APRLLIYDASNRATGIPARFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFA





VYYCQQSSNWPRTFGQGTKVE





IK







5C4 VH 4
QVQLVESGGGVVQPGRSLRLD
61



BMS-936558
CKASGITFSNSGMHWVRQAPG





KGLEWVAVIWYDGSKRYYADS





VKGRFTISRDNSKNTLFLQMN





SLRAEDTAVYYCATNDDYWGQ





GTLVTVSS







5C4 VL 11
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
62



BMS-936558
SCRASQSVSSYLAWYQQKPGQ





APRLLIYDASNRATGIPARFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFA





VYYCQQSSNWPRTFGQGTKVE





IK







4A11 VH 5
QLQLQESGPGLVKPSETLSLT
63




CTVSGGSLSRSSFFWGWIRQP





PGKGLEWIGSIYYSGSTYYNP





SLKSRVTISVDTSKNQFSLKL





SSVTAADTAVYYCVRDYDILT





GDEDYWGQGTLVTVSS







4A11 VL 12
DIQMTQSPSSLSASVGDRVSI
64




TCRASQGISSWLAWYQQKPEK





APKSLIYAASNLRSGVPSRFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLQPEDFA





TYYCQQYYSYPRTFGQGTKVE





IK







7D3 VH 6
QVQLVESGGGVVQPGRSLRLS
65




CTTSGITFSSYGFHWVRQAPG





KGLEWVAVIWYDGSKKYYADS





VKGRFTLSRDDSKNTLYLQMN





SLRAEDTAVYYCVTGDDYWGQ





GTLVTVSS







7D3 VL 13
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
66




SCRASQSVSSYLAWYQQKPGQ





APRLLIYDASNRATGIPARFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFA





VYYCQQRSNWPLTFGGGTKVE





IK







5F4 VH 7
QLQLQESGPGLVKPSETLSLT
67




CSVSGGSLSRSSYFWGWIRQP





PGKGLEWIASIFYSGETYFNP





SLKSRVTISVDTSRNQFSLKL





SSVTAADTAVYYCARDYDILT





GDEDYWGQGTLVTVSS







5F4 VL 14
DIQMTQSPSSLSASVGDRVTI
68




TCRASQGISSWLAWYQQKPEK





APKSLIYAASSLQSGVPSRFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLQPEDFA





TYYCQQYYSYPRTFGQGTKVE





IK







3G10 VH 15
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGASVKVS
69




CKASGYTFTDYGFSWVRQAPG





QGLEWMGWITAYNGNTNYAQK





LQGRVTMTTDTSTSTVYMELR





SLRSDDTAVYYCARDYFYGMD





VWGQGTTVTVSS







3G10 VL 25
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
70




SCRASQSVSSYLVWYQQKPGQ





APRLLIYDASNRATGIPARFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFA





VYYCQQRSNWPRTFGQGTKVE





IK







12A4 VH 16
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGSSVKVS
71



BMS-936559
CKTSGDTFSTYAISWVRQAPG





QGLEWMGGIIPIFGKAHYAQK





FQGRVTITADESTSTAYMELS





SLRSEDTAVYFCARKFHFVSG





SPFGMDVWGQGTTVTVSS







12A4 VL 26
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
72



BMS-93655
SCRASQSVSSYLAWYQQKPGQ





APRLLIYDASNRATGIPARFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFA





VYY







10A5 VH 17
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGASVKVS
73




CKASGYTFTSYDVHWVRQAPG





QRLEWMGWLHADTGITKFSQK





FQGRVTITRDTSASTAYMELS





SLRSEDTAVYYCARERIQLWF





DYWGQGTLVTVSS







10A5 VL 27
DIQMTQSPSSLSASVGDRVTI
74




TCRASQGISSWLAWYQQKPEK





APKSLIYAASSLQSGVPSRFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLQPEDFA





TYYCQQYNSYPYTFGQGTKLE





IK







5F8 VH 18
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGSSVKVS
75




CKVSGGIFSTYAINWVRQAPG





QGLEWMGGIIPIFGTANHAQK





FQGRVTITADESTSTAYMELS





SLRSEDTAVYYCARDQGIAAA





LFDYWGQGTLVTVSS







5F8 28
EIVLTQSPGTLSLSPGERATL
76




SCRASQSVSSSYLAWYQQKPG





QAPRLLIYGASSRATGIPDRF





SGSGSGTDFTLTISRLEPEDF





AVYYCQQYGSSPWTFGQGTKV





EIK







10H10 VH 19
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGRSLRLS
77




CAVSGFTFDDYVVHWVRQAPG





KGLEWVSGISGNSGNIGYADS





VKGRFTISRDNAKNSLYLQMN





SLRAEDTALYYCAVPFDYWGQ





GTLVTVSS







10H10 29
DIQMTQSPSSLSASVGDRVTI
78




TCRASQGISSWLAWYQQKPEK





APKSLIYAASSLQSGVPSRFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLQPEDFA





TYYCQQYNSYPYTFGQGTKLE





IK







1B12 VH 20
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGSSVKVS
79




CKTSGDTFSSYAISWVRQAPG





QGLEWMGGIIPIFGRAHYAQK





FQGRVTITADESTSTAYMELS





SLRSEDTAVYFCARKFHFVSG





SPFGMDVWGQGTTVTVSS







1B12 30
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
80




SCRASQSVSSYLAWYQQKPGQ





APRLLIYDASNRATGIPARFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFA





VYYCQQRSNWPTFGQGTKVEI





K







7H1 VH 21
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGSSVKVS
81




CKTSGGTFSSYAISWVRQAPG





QGLEWMGGIIPIFGKAHYAQK





FQGRVTITADESTTTAYMELS





SLRSEDTAVYYCARKYDYVSG





SPFGMDVWGQGTTVTVSS







7H1 31
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
82




SCRASQSVSSYLAWYQQKPGQ





APRLLIYDASNRATGIPARFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFA





VYYCQQRSNWPTFGQGTKVEI





K*







11E6 VH 22
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGSSVKVS
83




CKASGGTFSSYAINWVRQAPG





QGLEWMGGIIPIFGSANYAQK





FQDRVTITADESTSAAYMELS





SLRSEDTAVYYCARDSSGWSR





YYMDVWGQGTTVTVSS







11E6 32
EIVLTQSPGTLSLSPGERATL
84




SCRASQSVSSSYLAWYQQKPG





QAPRLLIYGASSRATGIPDRF





SGSGSGTDFTLTISRLEPEDF





AVYYCQQYGSSPFGGGTKVEI





K*







12B7 VH 23
QVQLVQSGAEVKEPGSSVKVS
85




CKASGGTFNSYAISWVRQAPG





QGLEWMGGIIPLFGIAHYAQK





FQGRVTITADESTNTAYMDLS





SLRSEDTAVYYCARKYSYVSG





SPFGMDVWGQGTTVTVSS







12B7 33
EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATL
86




SCRASQSVSSYLAWYQQKPGQ





APRLLIYDASNRATGIPARFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFA





VYYCQQRSNWPTFGQGTRLEI





K







13G4 VH 24
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGRSLRLS
87




CAASGITFDDYGMHWVRQAPG





KGLEWVSGISWNRGRIEYADS





VKGRFTISRDNAKNSLYLQMN





SLRAEDTALYYCAKGRFRYFD





WFLDYWGQGTLVTVSS







13G4 34
AIQLTQSPSSLSASVGDRVTI
88




TCRASQGISSALAWYQQKPGK





APKLLIYDASSLESGVPSRFS





GSGSGTDFTLTISSLQPEDFA





TYYCQQFNSYPFTFGPGTKVD





IK







28-8 VH 35
METGLRWLLLVAVLKGVQCLS
89




VEESGGRLVTPGTPLTLTCTA





SGFTITNYHMFWVRQAPGKGL





EWIGVITSSGIGSSSTTYYAT





WAKGRFTISKTSTTVNLRITS





PTTEDTATYFCARDYFTNTYY





ALDIWGPGTLVTVSS







28-8 VL 36
MDTRAPTQLLGLLLLWLPGAR
90




CALVMTQTPSSTSTAVGGTVT





IKCQASQSISVYLAWYQQKPG





QPPKLLIYSASTLASGVPSRF





KGSRSGTEYTLTISGVQREDA





ATYYCLGSAGS









DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS

I. Methods of Treatment


The present methods encompass treatment of cancer employing at least one dose or radiation therapy and at least one dose of at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist. For instance, a method of treating cancer in a patient may include administering at least one dose of radiation therapy and administering at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on the same day as a dose of radiation therapy or up to and including 4 days later.


The method of treating cancer may be administered once (as a single treatment cycle) or it may be administered more than once (i.e., with multiple treatment cycles), such as on a weekly, every other week, every three weeks, or every month cycle. If the method is administered more than once, it may be administered 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 times, or more.


While not being bound by theory, in a range of established syngeneic tumor models we found that low doses of fractionated RT led to upregulation of tumor cell expression of PD-L1 in vivo. We show that fractionated RT delivered in combination with αPD-1 or αPD-L1 mAbs generated effective anti-tumor CD8+ responses, which improved local tumor control and long-term survival, and protected against tumor rechallenge by the induction of a tumor antigen-specific memory immune response. CD8+ T cell production of IFNγ was found to be responsible for the upregulation of PD-L1 on tumor cells following fractionated RT. Furthermore, scheduling of anti-PD-L1 mAb relative to the delivery of fractionated RT appeared to affect therapeutic outcome; with administration of the antagonist on the same day as RT or up to and including 4 days after the first dose of fractionated RT showing benefit over administration of the antagonist more than 7 days after the conclusion of radiation therapy. And, while not being bound by theory, upregulation of tumor cell PD-L1 expression in response to low doses of fractionated RT, as used routinely in the clinic, appears to be a mechanism of adaptive immunological resistance by tumor cells; with the PD-L1/PD-1 signalling axis therefore potentially contributing to RT treatment failure. Combination therapy with RT and blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 signalling axis has the potential to overcome this resistance but, based on our preclinical studies, dosage timing impacts the treatment results, providing important new insights for translation to the clinic.


A. PD-1 and/or PD-L1 Antagonists for Use in Methods of Treatment


In one embodiment, the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist for use the present methods is an anti-PD-1 and/or anti-PD-L1 antibody or functional part thereof.


In one aspect, the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on the same day as a dose of radiation therapy or up to and including 4 days later. For example, in one aspect, if radiation therapy is provided on day 1 of a treatment cycle, the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist may also be administered on day 1 of the treatment cycle (i.e., the same day as a dose of radiation therapy). In another aspect, if radiation therapy is provided on day 1 of a treatment cycle, the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on day 5 (i.e., 4 days later). In a further aspect, the PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist may be administered on day 1, day 2, day 3, day 4, day 5, day 6, and/or day 7 of a treatment cycle (including both single and multiple treatment schedules).


In one embodiment, the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered multiple times in a treatment cycle. In another embodiment, the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered 2, 3, 4, 5 or more times in a treatment cycle. For example, the antagonist may be administered three times a week for a one-week treatment cycle, or three times a week for a treatment cycle with two or more weeks as described above.


In one aspect, the antibody or functional part thereof is chosen from those disclosed in US Publication 2010/0028330, which is incorporated by reference for the teaching of these antibodies and functional parts thereof. In one embodiment, the antibody if MEDI4736.


In another embodiment, the anti-PD-1 and/or anti-PD-L1 antibody is pembrolizumab, nivolumab, BMS-936558, AMP-224, or MPDL3280A.


The antibodies or functional parts thereof are administered in therapeutically effective amounts. Generally, a therapeutically effective amount may vary with the subject's age, condition, and sex, as well as the severity of the medical condition of the subject. A therapeutically effective amount of an antibody or functional part thereof ranges from about 0.001 to about 30 mg/kg body weight, from about 0.01 to about 25 mg/kg body weight, from about 0.1 to about 20 mg/kg body weight, or from about 1 to about 10 mg/kg. The dosage may be adjusted, as necessary, to suit observed effects of the treatment. The appropriate dose is chosen based on clinical indications by a treating physician.


The antibodies may be given as a bolus dose, to maximize the circulating levels of antibodies for the greatest length of time after the dose. Continuous infusion may also be used after the bolus dose.


As used herein, the term antibody or functional part thereof is used in the broadest sense. It may be man-made such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) produced by conventional hybridoma technology, recombinant technology and/or a functional fragment thereof. It may include both intact immunoglobulin molecules for example a polyclonal antibody, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), a monospecific antibody, a bispecific antibody, a polyspecific antibody, a human antibody, a humanized antibody, an animal antibody (e.g. camelid antibody), chimeric antibodies, as well as portions, fragments, regions, peptides and derivatives thereof (provided by any known technique, such as, but not limited to, enzymatic cleavage, peptide synthesis, or recombinant techniques), such as, for example, immunoglobulin devoid of light chains, Fab, Fab′, F(ab′)2, Fv, scFv, antibody fragment, diabody, Fd, CDR regions, or any portion or peptide sequence of the antibody that is capable of binding antigen or epitope. In one embodiment, the functional part is a single chain antibody, a single chain variable fragment (scFv), a Fab fragment, or a F(ab′)2 fragment.


An antibody or functional part is said to be “capable of binding” a molecule if it is capable of specifically reacting with the molecule to thereby bind the molecule to the antibody. Antibody fragments or portions may lack the Fc fragment of intact antibody, clear more rapidly from the circulation, and may have less non-specific tissue binding than an intact antibody. Examples of antibody may be produced from intact antibodies using methods well known in the art, for example by proteolytic cleavage with enzymes such as papain (to produce Fab fragments) or pepsin (to produce F(ab′)2 fragments). Portions of antibodies may be made by any of the above methods, or may be made by expressing a portion of the recombinant molecule. For example, the CDR region(s) of a recombinant antibody may be isolated and subcloned into an appropriate expression vector.


In one embodiment, an antibody or functional part is a human antibody. The use of human antibodies for human therapy may diminish the chance of side effects due to an immunological reaction in a human individual against nonhuman sequences. In another embodiment, the antibody or functional part is humanized. In another embodiment, an antibody or functional part is a chimeric antibody. This way, sequences of interest, such as for instance a binding site of interest, can be included into an antibody or functional part.


In one embodiment, the antibody may have an IgG, IgA, IgM, or IgE isotype. In one embodiment, the antibody is an IgG.


B. Radiation Therapy for Use in Methods of Treatment


Radiation therapy, also known as high-dose ionizing irradiation, is a component of the present therapeutic approach.


In one mode, the radiation therapy is fractionated radiation therapy. In one embodiment, the fractionated radiation therapy comprises from 2 to 7 fractions. In another embodiment, the fractionated radiation therapy comprises from 3 to 6 fractions. In another embodiment, the fractionated radiation therapy comprises from 4 to 5 fractions. In one mode, the fractionated radiation therapy comprises 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 fractions. In one embodiment, the fractionated radiation therapy comprises 5 fractions.


In one mode, the radiation therapy fractions are administered in sequential days. In one mode, radiation therapy may include more than one dose on a day and/or doses on sequential days. In one mode, the radiation therapy fractions are administered on day 1, day 2, day 3, day 4, and day 5. In another mode, the radiation therapy comprises about 10 Gy in 5 fractions (i.e., 2 Gy on each of 5 days).


Other fractionation schedules may be employed including accelerated fractionation (treatment given in larger daily or weekly doses to reduce the number of weeks of treatment), hyperfractionation (smaller doses of radiation given more than once a day), or hypofractionation (larger doses given once a day or less often to reduce the number of treatments).


The radiation therapy may be x-rays, gamma rays, or charged particles. The radiation therapy may be external-beam radiation therapy or internal radiation therapy (also called brachytherapy). Systemic radiation therapy, using radioactive substances, such as radioactive iodine, may also be employed.


External-beam radiation therapy includes 3D conformational radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy, tomotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, proton therapy, or other charged particle beams.


C. Cancers for Treatment


The present methods may be used to treat a variety of types of cancer. In one aspect, the method may be used to treat melanoma, colorectal cancer, or breast cancer. In one embodiment, the breast cancer is triple negative breast cancer.


In one embodiment, the cancer is cancer is adrenocortical tumors, adrenal cancer, anal cancer, bile duct cancer, bladder cancer, bone cancer, brain cancer, breast cancer, central nervous system cancer, cervical cancer, chest cancer, colon cancer, colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, epidermoid carcinoma, esophageal cancer, eye cancer, glioblastoma, glioma, gallbladder cancer, gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, gestational trophoblastic disease, head and neck, Hodgkin disease, Kaposi sarcoma, kidney cancer, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer, leukemia, liver cancer (such as hepatocellular carcinoma), lung cancer (including non-small cell, small cell, and lung carcinoid tumors), lymph node cancer, lymphoma, lymphoma of the skin, melanoma, mesothelioma, mouth cancer, multiple myeloma, nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer, osteosarcoma, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer, penile cancer, pituitary cancer, prostate cancer, pediatric malignancies, rectal cancer, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, salivary gland, sarcoma, skin cancer, small intestine cancer, stomach cancer, testicular cancer, thymus cancer, throat cancer, thyroid cancer, uterine cancer, vaginal cancer, or vulvar cancers.


Reference will now be made in detail to the present exemplary embodiments, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Wherever possible, the same reference numbers will be used throughout the drawings to refer to the same or like parts. Other embodiments will be apparent to those skilled in the art from consideration of the specification and practice disclosed herein. The embodiments are further explained in the following examples. These examples do not limit the scope of the claims, but merely serve to clarify certain embodiments. It is intended that the specification and examples be considered as exemplary only, with a true scope and spirit being indicated by the following claims.


EXAMPLES
Example 1
Methods

A) Mice and Cell Lines


BALB/c and C57Bl/6 mice were obtained from Harlan, U.K. All animal experiments were approved by a local ethical committee and performed under a United Kingdom Home Office license. CT26 murine colon carcinoma cells (ATCC) and 4434 cells isolated from BRafV600E p16−/− mice (Richard Marias, Cancer Research UK, Manchester Institute) were maintained in DMEM, and 4T1 triple negative breast cancers (ATCC) maintained in RPMI-1640, supplemented with 10% FCS, 1% L-glutamine (Invitrogen, U.K.). All cell lines were routinely screened to confirm the absence of Mycoplasma contamination.


B) Tumor Therapy


Mice were inoculated sub-cutaneously (s.c.) with either 5×105 CT26, 1×105 4 T1 or 5×106 4434 cells. Irradiations were performed 7-10 days after inoculation (when tumors were at least 100 mm3) using a Pantak HF-320 320 kV x-ray unit (Gulmay Medical, U.K.). The machine was operated at 300 kV, 9.2 mA, with filtration fitted in the x-ray beam to give a radiation quality of 2.3 mm Cu half-value layer. Mice were positioned at a distance of 350 mm from the x-ray focus, where the dose rate was 0.80 Gy/min. Administration of αPD-1 (clone RMPI-14), αPD-L1 (clone 10F.9G2) (both Biolegend) or isotype control mAb (IgG2a and IgG2b respectively) commenced on day 1 of the fractionated RT cycle (unless otherwise stated) and was administered intra-peritoneally (i.p.) 3qw for up to 3 weeks at a dose of 10 mg/kg in a dose volume of 100 μl/10 g in PBS. For cellular and cytokine depletion experiments mice received either αCD8 mAb; clone YTS169 (a gift from M. Glennie, Southampton University), αCD4 mAb; clone GK1.5 (Biolegend), αAsialo-GM1 (Wako Chemicals) or αIFNγ; clone XMG1.2 (BioXcell). Peripheral blood was sampled during therapy to confirm cellular depletion. For tumor rechallenge experiments, long-term surviving (LTS) mice were implanted contralaterally with tumor cells a minimum of 100 days after previous tumor implantation. Additional control mice were also implanted to confirm tumor growth. Experimental groups contained at least 5 mice/group and are representative at least 2 independent experiments.


C) Measurement of Cytokine Production by CD8+ T Cells Isolated from Long-Term Surviving Mice


For in vitro stimulation 3.5×106 splenocytes from either LTS or control mice were cultured for 5 days in RPMI-1640 supplemented with 10% FCS, 100 U/ml penicillin, 100 μg/ml streptomycin, 1% L-glutamine, 50 μM 2-ME and 10 IU/ml human recombinant IL-2 in the presence of either 1×106 tumor cells irradiated with 50 Gy or 1 μmol/ml of the H2-Ld restricted peptides SPSYVYHQF (SEQ ID NO: 91) (AH1)/TPHPARIGL (SEQ ID NO: 92) (β-galactosidase) (Anaspec, U.K.). Experimental groups contained 3-5 mice and are representative of 2 independent experiments. After 5 days in culture, cells were restimulated at a 1:1 ratio with 50 Gy irradiated tumor cells for 16 hours in the presence of 3 ug/ml Brefeldin A (BD Pharmingen, U.K.) and 100 IU/ml human recombinant IL-2 (Chiron, NL). For FACS analysis, cells were washed and incubated with rat anti-CD16/32 (eBioscience, U.K.) to block non-specific binding and then stained with a FITC conjugated anti-CD8a mAb (eBioscience, U.K.). Cells were then fixed/permeabilized and stained for expression of IFNγ using an APC conjugated mAb (eBioscience, U.K.).


D) Tumor and Immune Cell Phenotyping by Flow Cytomtery


To obtain single cell suspensions, tumors were processed using a gentleMacs dissociator and a murine tumor dissociation kit (Miltenyi Biotec, U.K.). For analysis, non-specific binding was blocked as described above and expression of CD4, CD8 (BD Biosciences, UK), CD45, NKP46, PD-1 and PD-L1 examined by multi-parameter flow cytometry (all eBioscience unless otherwise stated).


E) In Vitro Co-cultures


Tumor cells were cultured in the presence of 20 ng/ml IFNγ and/or TNFα for 24 hours prior to evaluation of PD-L1 expression by flow cytometry as described above. For co-culture assay either resting or activated splenocytes (treated with PBS or phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate and Ionomycin cell stimulation cocktail respectively, (eBioscience, UK)) were co-cultured at a 1:1 ratio with tumor cells and tumor cell expression of PD-L1 determined as described above. Silencing of IFNγR1 expression was achieved by lentiviral transduction of cells with ShRNA (cells were also transduced with non-targeting ShRNA as controls) (Thermo Scientific, UK). Measurement of splenocyte cytokine production (IFNγ and TNFα) was measured by intracellular flow cytometry as described above.


Example 2
Blockade of PD-1 or PD-L1 Enhances the Therapeutic Efficacy of RT

Radiation therapy has been shown to modulate the immunogenicity of tumor cells but is rarely able to generate durable therapeutic responses that lead to systemic anti-tumor immunity alone. We show that low doses of local fractionated dose RT delivered as about 10 Gy in 5 fractions leads to increased tumor cell expression of PD-L1 with elevated expression evident 1, 3 and 5 days after the last dose of RT when compared to time-matched, non-treated (NT) mice (FIGS. 1A and B). This RT-mediated increase in tumor cell PD-L1 expression peaks at 72 hours after the last dose of RT and although it declines significantly by 7 days post RT (when compared to expression at days 1 and 3; P<0.05 and P<0.01 respectively, Mann-Whitney test) remains elevated when compared to NT mice (P<0.05, Mann-Whitney test).


Given these observations we hypothesized that the immune response generated following RT may be limited through the PD-1/PD-L1 axis. Local RT delivered as about 10 Gy in 5 daily fractions was found to significantly improve survival in mice bearing established CT26 tumors when compared to NT controls (FIGS. 1C and D; P<0.05 Log-rank; Mantel-Cox test). Our data demonstrate that this RT-mediated local tumor control can be substantially improved through combination with either αPD-L1 mAb or αPD-1 mAb (FIGS. 1C and D; P<0.001 Log-rank; Mantel-Cox test). Combined therapy led to a synergistic anti-tumor response which was curative in 66% and 80% of mice that received RT in combination with αPD-L1 mAb or αPD-1 mAb respectively. In contrast to combination with RT, monotherapy with either αPD-L1 mAb or αPD-1 mAb did not significantly improve survival (FIGS. 1C and D; P>0.05 Log-rank; Mantel-Cox test). Further, no significant benefit was observed when mice received RT in combination with both αPD-1 and αPD-L1 mAb vs. combination with either mAb alone (FIG. 7).


Blockade of PD-L1 also improved response to RT in mice bearing established 4T1 tumors where combined therapy significantly reduced tumor burden by 38% when compared to RT alone (FIG. 1E; 10 days post start of therapy; 184.3±13.5 mm2 vs. 292.8±14.3 mm2 respectively, P<0.01 Mann-Whitney test) and significantly improved survival (P<0.001 Log-rank; Mantel-Cox test; data not shown). Similar results were also observed in mice bearing established 4434 melanomas (FIG. 1F). Combination therapy with local RT and mAbs targeting either PD-1 or PD-L1 was well tolerated in both BALB/c and C57Bl/6 mice (FIGS. 8A and B). These preclinical data clearly demonstrate the potential to improve outcome following low dose fractionated RT of established solid tumors through blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis.


Example 3
NK Cells Contribute to Local Tumor Control Following Combination Therapy but Long-term Survival is Dependent on CD8+ T Cells

We next investigated the mechanisms underlying the long-term tumor control observed following combination RT and αPD-L1 mAb therapy. Initially colony forming assays were used to confirm that αPD-1 and αPD-L1 mAb were not acting as radiation sensitizers through direct interaction with tumor cells (FIG. 9A-C). Using depleting antibodies, we next explored the role of effector T cells and NK cells in mediating anti-tumor activity following RT/αPD-L1 mAb combination therapy. Our data demonstrate that as early as 7 days after the start of a 5 day fractionated RT cycle (with αPD-L1 mAb therapy commencing on day 1 of the RT cycle) reduced tumor burden is evident in mice following combination therapy when compared to NT mice (207.5±29.2 mm2 vs. 409.4±86.88 mm2 respectively; P=0.067, Mann-Whitney U test) (FIG. 2A). However, this statistical trend to reduced volume was lost following depletion of either CD8+ T cells or NK cells, where tumor volumes were not significantly different from those in NT cohorts (P=0.52 and P=0.70 respectively, Mann-Whitney U test) but significantly larger than mice that received combination therapy without immune cell depletion (P<0.01; combined therapy vs. CD8 depletion, and P<0.05; combined therapy vs. NK cell depletion, Mann-Whitney U test). By day 11 post treatment, combination therapy significantly reduces tumor burden when compared to NT controls (P<0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Whilst the depletion of either CD8+ T cells or NK cells at this time point reduces the efficacy of combination therapy (P<0.001 and P<0.05 respectively, Mann-Whitney U test), the relative contribution of CD8+ T cells and NK cells becomes more evident with significantly reduced tumor control in CD8 vs. NK cell depleted mice (P<0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). Our data also reveal that the depletion of CD4+ T cells improved local tumor control following combination therapy (153.2±27.0 mm2 vs. 72.7±17.3 mm2 respectively; P<0.05, Mann-Whitney U test).


In contrast to early tumor control following combination RT/αPD-L1 mAb therapy, long term survival (LTS) was not impacted by the depletion of NK cells (70% LTS mice following treatment with RT/αPD-L1 vs. 77.8% following combination therapy with NK cell depletion) (FIG. 2B). The depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes increased the frequency of LTS mice from 70% to 87.5% (combination vs. combination+CD4 depletion) but this did not achieve significance (P>0.05 Log-rank; Mantel-Cox test). However, the depletion of CD8+ T cells completely abrogated the therapeutic efficacy of combination RT/αPD-L1 mAb therapy (P<0.001 Log-rank; Mantel-Cox test). Depletion of immune cell populations was confirmed by flow cytometry on peripheral blood samples (FIG. 2C). These data suggest that whilst NK cells may exert some local tumor control this does not impact overall survival and while CD4+ T cells are dispensable or even capable of suppressing responses, CD8+ T cells appear to mediate effective long term tumor control following treatment with RT and αPD-L1 mAb.


Example 4
Treatment with αPD-L1 mAb and RT Generates Protective Tumor Antigen-specific Memory T Cell Responses

We next investigated whether immunological memory was generated following treatment with RT and αPD-L1 mAb. We show that LTS mice originally treated with RT and αPD-L1 mAb were able to completely reject tumors following contralateral rechallenge (FIG. 3A). To quantify this memory response splenocytes were harvested from LTS mice that had greater than 100 days of disease free survival and the capacity of CD8+ T cells to produce IFNγ following co-culture with peptide derived from a CT26 tumor associated antigen (AH1: SPSYVYHQF (SEQ ID NO: 91)), control peptide (β-galactosidase: TPHARIGL (SEQ ID NO: 93)) or with irradiated CT26 cells was assessed (FIGS. 3B and C). Our data reveal that LTS mice were endowed with a significantly greater frequency of IFNγ-producing CD8+ T lymphocytes following co-culture with AH1 peptide than naïve mice (6.6%±0.8 vs 2.3%±0.2 respectively; P<0.05, Mann-Whitney test). A similar response was observed following co-culture of splenocytes with CT26 cells. Comparison of peptide and tumor cell co-cultures revealed that the frequency of memory CD8+ T cells was ˜3 fold lower in LTS mice following co-culture with tumor cells than with AH1 peptide and may reflect tumor cell-mediated suppression of T cell activation. Taken together these data demonstrate that RT when combined with blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis in mouse models can generate protective immunological memory in long-term survivors.


Example 5
Fractionated RT Leads to CD8+ T Cell Dependent Adaptive Upregulation of Tumor Cell PD-L1 Expression

Initially we confirmed that treatment of tumor cells with a range of RT doses in vitro did not have any direct impact on expression of PD-L1 (FIG. 4A). To identify which cellular populations within the tumor microenvironment were responsible for modulating tumor cell expression of PD-L1 mice received a fractionated RT cycle in combination with CD8, CD4 or NK cell depleting antibodies. Our data reveal that the depletion of CD8+ T cells but not NK cells completely abrogates the RT-mediated upregulation of PD-L1 on tumor cells (FIGS. 4B and C). Interestingly, the depletion of CD4+ T cells was found to further augment RT-mediated upregulation of PD-L1 on tumor cells (˜2 fold compared to treatment with RT alone).


Example 6
Adaptive Upregulation of PD-L1 by Tumor Cells Following Fractionated RT is IFNγ Dependent

Given the clinical correlation between IFNγ in the tumor microenvironment and PD-L1 expression (16) and the impact of TNFα on this response (22) we evaluated the impact of these cytokines on PD-L1 in our cell lines. Co-culture of tumor cells with recombinant IFNγ leads to a significant 20 fold increase in cell surface expression of PD-L1 in vitro (FIG. 5A). Furthermore, whilst addition of recombinant TNFα alone has no impact on tumor cell expression of PD-L1, a cocktail of both IFNγ and TNFα can further augment tumor cell PD-L1 expression (˜2 fold) when compared to expression with IFNγ alone (FIG. 5A). We show that silencing of IFN-γ-receptor 1 (IFNγR1) on CT26 tumor cells using ShRNA completely abrogates the upregulation of PD-L1 following co-culture with either recombinant IFNγ or both IFNγ and TNFα (FIG. 5A).


To establish whether activated immune cells could lead to an adaptive change in tumor cell expression of PD-L1 through the production of IFNγ and TNFα, WT CT26 cells and those transduced with either non-targeting ShRNA (NTC ShRNA) and IFNγR1 ShRNA were co-cultured with isolated resting (PBS-treated) and activated (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin-treated) splenocytes (FIGS. 5B and C). Importantly, these experiments demonstrate that activated immune cells can elevate tumor cell PD-L1 expression at physiologically relevant concentrations of IFNγ and TNFα, in an IFNγR1-dependent manner.


To confirm the role of IFNγ on tumor cell expression of PD-L1 in response to RT in vivo, mice received RT in combination with αIFNγ blocking antibody (or isotype control). IFNγ blockade reduced tumor cell expression of PD-L1 by 2.6 fold in NT mice to the level observed on CT26 cells cultured in vitro; suggesting adaptive upregulation of PD-L1 occurs following implantation of tumor (FIGS. 5D and E). However, the significant upregulation of PD-L1 observed following RT (2.4 fold compared to NT control) was completely abrogated by IFNγ blockade confirming this as the driver of adaptive tumor cell expression of PD-L1 following RT treatment.


Example 7
Concomitant Scheduling of αPD-L1 mAb and RT Generates an Effective Anti-tumor Immune Response

We evaluated 3 distinct combination schedules where mice bearing established CT26 tumors received a fractionated RT cycle of about 10 Gy in 5 fractions with administration of αPD-L1 mAb commencing either on day 1 of the fractionated RT cycle (schedule A), day 5 of the cycle (schedule B) or 7 days after completion of RT (schedule C) (FIG. 6A). No significant difference in overall survival was found between schedule A and B with LTS of 60% and 57 respectively (P>0.05 Log-rank; Mantel-Cox test) (FIG. 6B and FIG. 10A). In contrast, sequential treatment with RT followed 7 days later by αPD-L1 mAb (Schedule C) was completely ineffective at enhancing overall survival when compared to RT alone (median survival of 30 days vs. 35 days respectively; P>0.05 Log-rank; Mantel-Cox test) despite similar tumor burden across groups (FIGS. 10B and C).


Analysis of tumor infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells 24 hours after the last dose of RT reveal increased expression of PD-1 when compared to time-matched NT controls (P<0.05, Mann-Whitney test) (FIG. 6C). In contrast, by 7 days post RT no change in PD-1 expression was evident on CD4+ T cells and was found to be significantly decreased on CD8+ T cells when compared to time-matched NT controls (P<0.05, Mann-Whitney test) (FIG. 6D). Expression of PD-1 was consistently found to be higher on tumor infiltrating CD8+ than CD4+ T cells (FIGS. 6C and D). We next compared activity following an acute vs. extended αPD-L1 mAb dosing protocol where mice received either 3 doses of mAb concurrent with RT or the same with dosing extended (3qw) for an additional 2 weeks. No additional benefit was observed with extended αPD-L1 mAb administration (FIG. 11).


Taken together these data demonstrate that treatment with low dose fractionated RT leads to an acute increase in PD-1 expression on T cells and that sequential therapy where blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 signalling axis is delayed until completion of an RT cycle may be ineffective potentially due to deletion or anergy of tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells.


Example 8
Discussion of Preceding Examples

Low doses of fractionated RT leads to upregulation of PD-L1 expression on tumor cells secondary to CD8+ T cell production of IFNγ. In mouse models of melanoma, colorectal and breast cancer we demonstrate that the activity of RT can be enhanced through combination with αPD-L1 mAb, leading to the generation of immunological memory in long-term surviving mice which is capable of protecting against tumor recurrence. Furthermore, our data reveal that dose scheduling may affect outcomes, with concurrent but not sequential therapy effective at improving local tumor control and survival.


This is the first preclinical study to demonstrate that fractionated RT leads to increased tumor cell expression of PD-L1 through CD8+ T cell production of IFNγ. Here, tumor cell expression of PD-L1 may act as a biomarker of a local anti-tumor response, suggesting that local RT may be sufficient to prime CD8+ T cell responses. However, whilst treatment with RT alone was unable to generate durable anti-cancer immunity, activity was found to be enhanced through mAb-mediated blockade of either PD-1 or PD-L1 suggesting that signalling through this axis may limit the immune response to RT. We saw no significant differences in overall survival between RT delivered in combination with either αPD-1 or αPD-L1, or a combination of both mAb. Given this observation it seems likely that the activity of these mAbs when delivered in combination with RT is through blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 signalling, and not mediated through the PD-L1/CD80 or PD-1/PD-L2 axes, although further experiments are needed to confirm this.


Our preclinical data reveal that the depletion of NK cells reduced local tumor control at early time points (up to 11 days post completion of RT) but did not impact on overall survival. In addition, the depletion of NK cells did not impact tumor cell expression of PD-L1 following RT suggesting their limited contribution to local IFNγ production. In contrast, whilst depletion of CD4+ T cells did not impact survival following combination therapy, substantial increases in tumor cell expression of PD-L1 post RT was observed. The depletion of CD4+ T cells impacts both helper T cell and Treg populations. Although further studies are needed to delineate the relative contributions of these sub-populations of CD4+ T cells we can speculate that CD4+ helper T cells may be dispensable for the generation of effective CD8+ T cell responses post RT/PD-L1 mAb therapy in our model and that either helper T cells, or more likely Treg, may be actively suppressing IFNγ production in the local tumor milieu. Therefore, the therapeutic potential to enhance anti-tumor responses by Treg depletion may be at least in part attenuated through enhanced tumor cell expression of PD-L1.


PD-L1 expression can be modulated by a number of cytokines including type-1 and 2 IFN, TNFα and TGFβ (16, 22, 30-32). We show that tumor cell expression of PD-L1 can be enhanced following co-culture with IFNγ and that addition of TNFα can further augment this response. However, blockade of IFNγR1 or in vivo depletion of IFNγ demonstrates dependence on IFNγ mediated signalling for upregulation of PD-L1, with TNFα alone incapable of modulating tumor cell PD-L1 expression. Interestingly, in vivo depletion of IFNγ reduces PD-L1 expression on syngeneic tumor cells, matching the expression profile of tumor cells in vitro. This suggests that the local tumor microenvironment in the absence of therapeutic intervention may foster immunologically driven tumor adaptation which may support tumor development. Similarly, in human melanocytic lesions expression of PD-L1 has been shown to co-localize with areas of CD8+ T cell infiltration and is postulated to represent an adaptive mechanism of immune escape (16). However, in our preclinical mouse models monotherapy with mAbs targeting PD-1/PD-L1 only demonstrates modest activity, suggesting that targeting this axis alone may be unlikely to bring about durable anti-tumor immune responses in all settings and underscores the requirement for a combinatorial approach.


In contrast to the use of a single 12 Gy dose (30), our results demonstrate that upregulation of PD-L1 occurs at much lower biologically effective doses involving delivery of fractionated RT using about 10 Gy in 5 daily fractions. This is an important finding given that this dose per fraction is more commonly used in routine clinical practice. Several studies have assessed the impact of RT dose fractionation; comparing single ablative doses, hypofractionated and fractionated RT, on the generation of anti-tumor immune responses and on the tumor microenvironment (4, 5, 25, 26, 33, 34). However, the results of these studies are equivocal and optimal RT delivery and the impact of RT dose fractionation on tumor cell expression of PD-L1 requires further investigation.


Previously, no research has addressed the impact of sequencing on the activity of RT and αPD-L1 mAb therapy. This is especially pertinent given the predisposition to adopting a sequenced combination regimen in the clinic as a strategy to maximize tolerability. We show that only blockade of PD-L1 at the time of RT delivery can enhance the therapeutic response in mouse models, with therapy 7 days after completion of RT no better than treatment with RT alone. In addition, our data reveal that PD-L1 expression is elevated by 24 hours after completion of a fractionated RT cycle and remains elevated for at least 7 days post completion. Moreover, we found elevated PD-1 expression on tumor infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells 24 hours post RT when compared to control cohorts. Expression of PD-1 was found to be consistently higher on CD8+ vs. CD4+ T cells. Taken together these data suggest that local fractionated RT can prime anti-tumor CD8+ T cell responses but that these may be attenuated by signalling through the PD-1/PD-L1 axis and early inhibition of this axis may generate durable effective anti-tumor responses. Further, the requirement for chronic vs. acute blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis when combined with RT is unclear. We observed no difference in survival when αPD-L1 mAb was administered 3qw over 1 week concurrent with RT delivery vs. an extended schedule of up to 3 weeks. These data suggest that combination approaches with RT may permit a reduction in the duration of αPD-1/PD-L1 mAb therapy required to achieve therapeutic anti-tumor immune responses. Together these data have important implications for clinical trial design.


In summary, this study demonstrates that treatment with fractionated RT leads to upregulation of tumor cell expression of PD-L1 and that blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis can enhance the immune response to fractionated RT in multiple syngeneic mouse models of cancer. Our data suggest that dose scheduling of αPD-L1 mAb with RT may generate therapeutic immune responses with the capacity to reduce tumor burden and improve survival. This therapeutic combination may be a promising approach for the treatment of many solid malignancies where RT is commonly used and translation to early phase clinical trial is clearly warranted.


Example 9
Treatment Protocols

Patient A has colorectal cancer. In week 1, patient A receives an effective amount of radiation therapy in five fractopms. In week 1, patient A also receives a therapeutic dose of MEDI4736 on day 1, day 3, and day 5. Patient A repeats this schedule for weeks 2, 3, 4, and 5.


Patient B has breast cancer. In week 1, patient B receives an effective amount of radiation therapy. In week 1, patient B also receives a therapeutic dose of MEDI4736 on day 5. Patient repeats this schedule for weeks 3, 5, and 7.


Example 10
Certain Embodiments

The following items provide certain embodiments disclosed herein.


Item 1. A method of treating cancer in a patient comprising

    • a. administering at least one dose of radiation therapy; and
    • b. administering at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist, wherein at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on the same day as a dose of radiation therapy or up to and including 4 days later.


Item 2. The method of item 1, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is an at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antibody or functional part thereof.


Item 3. The method of any one of items 1-2, wherein the dose of radiation therapy is about 11 Gy or lower.


Item 4. The method of item 3, wherein the dose of radiation therapy is about 10 Gy or lower.


Item 5. The method of any one of items 1-4, wherein the radiation therapy is fractionated radiation therapy.


Item 6. The method of item 5, wherein the fractionated radiation therapy comprises from 2 to 7 fractions.


Item 7. The method of item 6, wherein the fractionated radiation therapy comprises 5 fractions.


Item 8. The method of any one of items 5-7, wherein the radiation therapy fractions are administered in sequential days.


Item 9. The method of any one of items 5-8, wherein the radiation therapy fractions are administered on day 1, day 2, day 3, day 4, and day 5.


Item 10. The method of any one of items 7-9, wherein the radiation therapy comprises about 10 Gy in 5 fractions.


Item 11. The method of any one of items 1-10, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on day 1.


Item 12. The method of any one of items 1-11, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on day 5.


Item 13. The method of any one of items 1-12, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered multiple times.


Item 14. The method of any one of items 1-13, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered 3 times a week.


Item 15. The method of any one of items 1-14, wherein the anti-PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antibody or functional part thereof is MEDI4736.


Item 16. The method of any one of items 1-15, wherein the anti-PD-1 and/or anti-PD-L1 antibody or functional part thereof is pembrolizumab, nivolumab, BMS-936558, AMP-224, or MPDL3280A.


Item 17. The method of any one of items 1-16, wherein the cancer is melanoma, colorectal cancer, or breast cancer.


Item 18. The method of any one of items 1-17, wherein more than one treatment cycle is performed.


Item 19. The method of item 18, wherein from 2-8 treatment cycles are performed.


Item 20. The method of any one of items 18-19, wherein the treatment cycles are weekly.


Item 21. The method of any one of items 18-19, wherein the treatment cycles are every other week.


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EQUIVALENTS

The foregoing written specification is considered to be sufficient to enable one skilled in the art to practice the embodiments. The foregoing description and Examples detail certain embodiments and describes the best mode contemplated by the inventors. It will be appreciated, however, that no matter how detailed the foregoing may appear in text, the embodiments may be practiced in many ways and the claims include any equivalents thereof.


As used herein, the term about refers to a numeric value, including, for example, whole numbers, fractions, and percentages, whether or not explicitly indicated. The term about generally refers to a range of numerical values (e.g., +/−5-10% of the recited value) that one of ordinary skill in the art would consider equivalent to the recited value (e.g., having the same function or result). In some instances, the term about may include numerical values that are rounded to the nearest significant figure.

Claims
  • 1. A method of treating cancer in a patient comprising a. administering to the patient a fraction of fractionated radiation therapy; andb. administering to the patient at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on the same day as the fraction of radiation therapy or up to and including 4 days later, wherein the fraction is 2.2 Gy or lower, and wherein the cancer is bladder cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, head and neck cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer or renal cancer.
  • 2. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is an at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antibody or functional part thereof.
  • 3. The method of claim 1, wherein the patient is administered fractions of radiation therapy that total about 70 Gy or lower.
  • 4. The method of claim 3, wherein the patient is administered fractions of radiation therapy that total about 50 Gy or lower.
  • 5. The method of claim 1, wherein the fractionated radiation therapy comprises from 2 to 7 fractions.
  • 6. The method of claim 5, wherein the fractionated radiation therapy comprises 5 fractions.
  • 7. The method of claim 6, wherein the radiation therapy fractions are administered in sequential days.
  • 8. The method of claim 7, wherein the radiation therapy fractions are administered on day 1, day 2, day 3, day 4, and day 5.
  • 9. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on day 1.
  • 10. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered on day 5.
  • 11. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered multiple times.
  • 12. The method of claim 11, wherein the at least one PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antagonist is administered 3 times a week.
  • 13. The method of claim 2, wherein the anti-PD-1 and/or PD-L1 antibody or functional part thereof is MEDI4736.
  • 14. The method of claim 2, wherein the anti-PD-1 and/or anti-PD-L1 antibody or functional part thereof is pembrolizumab, nivolumab, BMS-936558, AMP-224, or MPDL3280A.
  • 15. The method of claim 1, wherein treatment cycles are weekly or every other week.
  • 16. The method of claim 1, wherein more than one treatment cycle is performed.
  • 17. The method of claim 16, wherein from 2-8 treatment cycles are performed.
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims benefit under 35 U.S.C. § 119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/013,157, filed Jun. 17, 2014, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety for all purposes.

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Related Publications (1)
Number Date Country
20160051672 A1 Feb 2016 US
Provisional Applications (1)
Number Date Country
62013157 Jun 2014 US